Title

Poster Session - Exploring Work Through Occupational Science

Location

Winter Garden

Start Time

16-10-2014 6:00 PM

End Time

16-10-2014 9:00 PM

Abstract

Keywords: work, identity, culture

Introduction

This research explores work through an occupational science lens. Economic, personal, and social aspects of work were examined. Five aspects of work examined include workers with intellectual disabilities, working mothers, immigrant Latinos, Japanese workers, and military members.

Five different aspects of work were examined through research of peer-reviewed scholarly articles in partial fulfillment of an occupational science course.

Three themes influencing how people experience work were identified as culture, identity, and motivation. Work is more than a source of income. It is a means by which people interact with their culture and community (Zimmerman, 2008). In addition, work satisfaction is closely related to having choice in employment and the degree to which it supports life balance.

Description of contribution to Occupational Science

Work can support and inhibit other meaningful life occupations of individuals and families. All five researched aspects of work are growing in relevance and significance: (a) Adults with intellectual disabilities are increasingly entering integrated work environments, but there is a lag between their legal rights and implementation of support in the workplace; (b) More women are working outside the home today, and are having difficulty balancing work and family; (c) Latino immigrants are another population that values work. The number of immigrants living and working in the United States is increasingly growing and many have lost their sense of identity by working in the United States; (d) Karoshi, a recent condition in which Japanese employees work to death, also has negative consequences for personal identity. This condition parallels with the modern emphasis of overwork; (e) In the last decade, war has become more culturally significant and individuals that either work in the field or are family members experience. Despite their differences, culture, identity, and drive are important underlying factors. This research will benefit the application of knowledge for occupational science by representing a variety of professions across cultures and age groups.

References

Zimmerman, R. A. (2008). Social capital and community membership. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 29(3), 173-178.

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Oct 16th, 6:00 PM Oct 16th, 9:00 PM

Poster Session - Exploring Work Through Occupational Science

Winter Garden

Keywords: work, identity, culture

Introduction

This research explores work through an occupational science lens. Economic, personal, and social aspects of work were examined. Five aspects of work examined include workers with intellectual disabilities, working mothers, immigrant Latinos, Japanese workers, and military members.

Five different aspects of work were examined through research of peer-reviewed scholarly articles in partial fulfillment of an occupational science course.

Three themes influencing how people experience work were identified as culture, identity, and motivation. Work is more than a source of income. It is a means by which people interact with their culture and community (Zimmerman, 2008). In addition, work satisfaction is closely related to having choice in employment and the degree to which it supports life balance.

Description of contribution to Occupational Science

Work can support and inhibit other meaningful life occupations of individuals and families. All five researched aspects of work are growing in relevance and significance: (a) Adults with intellectual disabilities are increasingly entering integrated work environments, but there is a lag between their legal rights and implementation of support in the workplace; (b) More women are working outside the home today, and are having difficulty balancing work and family; (c) Latino immigrants are another population that values work. The number of immigrants living and working in the United States is increasingly growing and many have lost their sense of identity by working in the United States; (d) Karoshi, a recent condition in which Japanese employees work to death, also has negative consequences for personal identity. This condition parallels with the modern emphasis of overwork; (e) In the last decade, war has become more culturally significant and individuals that either work in the field or are family members experience. Despite their differences, culture, identity, and drive are important underlying factors. This research will benefit the application of knowledge for occupational science by representing a variety of professions across cultures and age groups.