Title

Poster Session - The influence of context on occupational selection in sport for development programs

Location

Winter Garden

Start Time

16-10-2014 6:00 PM

End Time

16-10-2014 9:00 PM

Abstract

Background. Sport-for-development is a growing phenomenon involving engagement in sport activities, or occupations to achieve international development goals. Kicking AIDS Out is one sport for development initiative that raises HIV/AIDS awareness through sport. Despite sport-for–development’s global prevalence, there is a paucity of literature exploring what occupations are used in sport-for-development and why. An occupational perspective is useful to help understand the selection of occupations, sport or otherwise, in sport-for-development programming and the context in which they are implemented.

Purpose. To understand how context influences occupational selection in Kicking AIDS Out.

Methods. Thematic analysis was used to analyse previously collected semi-structured interview data of Kicking AIDS Out staff in Lusaka, Zambia and Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago.

Results. Kicking AIDS Out leaders filter contextual information to ultimately select occupations. The major contextual influences were: balancing the needs of attendees and leaders; and different understandings of sport as a development tool.

Implications. To enable a better fit of context and occupation, and accomplishment of international development goals, sport for development programmes might consider how context affects the goals of the program, and how leaders are trained to select occupations to achieve these goals.

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Oct 16th, 6:00 PM Oct 16th, 9:00 PM

Poster Session - The influence of context on occupational selection in sport for development programs

Winter Garden

Background. Sport-for-development is a growing phenomenon involving engagement in sport activities, or occupations to achieve international development goals. Kicking AIDS Out is one sport for development initiative that raises HIV/AIDS awareness through sport. Despite sport-for–development’s global prevalence, there is a paucity of literature exploring what occupations are used in sport-for-development and why. An occupational perspective is useful to help understand the selection of occupations, sport or otherwise, in sport-for-development programming and the context in which they are implemented.

Purpose. To understand how context influences occupational selection in Kicking AIDS Out.

Methods. Thematic analysis was used to analyse previously collected semi-structured interview data of Kicking AIDS Out staff in Lusaka, Zambia and Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago.

Results. Kicking AIDS Out leaders filter contextual information to ultimately select occupations. The major contextual influences were: balancing the needs of attendees and leaders; and different understandings of sport as a development tool.

Implications. To enable a better fit of context and occupation, and accomplishment of international development goals, sport for development programmes might consider how context affects the goals of the program, and how leaders are trained to select occupations to achieve these goals.