Title

ISOS Session [2]: Critical Occupational Perspectives on Societal Issues: Reframing the problems of ‘population aging’

Location

Great Hall

Start Time

16-10-2014 8:30 AM

End Time

16-10-2014 10:00 AM

Session Type

Panel

Abstract

Occupational scientists have proposed that an occupational perspective can offer new insights on societal issues that have both a particular local character and also transcend international boundaries. The aim of this workshop is to generate critical occupational perspectives on international concerns framed as ‘population aging’. Within various nations, population aging is often framed as a threat to societal and economic stability, and major policy changes are proposed or being made in areas such as health and pension policy. Three North American presenters with diverse international connections will spark dialogues on the challenges and opportunities for building connections with occupational scientists who do research on ‘population aging’ outside North America. The first part will consider how to connect with international colleagues on research methods that can raise critical perspectives about local occupational experiences of aging and the local and global governance that determines structural possibilities for aging well in diverse socio-cultural contexts. The second part will consider issues for publishing international, critical perspectives on ‘population aging’. The presenters will consider the issues for connecting occupational science research on ‘population aging’ in countries with and without taken-for-granted social supports which are being privatized under neo-liberal policies that accept class-based inequity. The presenters will use examples from their research to re-frame dialogue and policy on aging by prompting insights on occupational justice, governmental regulation of occupational possibilities and more. The anticipated workshop outcome is to stimulate dialogue and insights on the opportunities, benefits, and challenges in building and sustaining international, interdisciplinary, occupational science research collaborations – from building relationships to negotiating funding and satisfying ethical requirements for shared research projects and publications. The workshop implications are for participants to use the dialogue to expand their own international networks to study aging and other societal issues from a critical occupational perspective.

References

Hacker, J.S. (2006). The Great Risk Shift: The Assault on American Jobs, Families, Health Care, and Retirement and How You Can Fight Back. New York: Oxford University Press.

Kennedy, J. (2002). Disability and Aging – Beyond the Crisis Rhetoric. Journal of Disability Studies, 12(4), 226-228.

Mendes, Felismina Rosa. (2013). Active ageing: a right or a duty? Health Sociology Review. 22(2), 174-185. DOI: 10.5172/hesr.2013.22.2.174.

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Oct 16th, 8:30 AM Oct 16th, 10:00 AM

ISOS Session [2]: Critical Occupational Perspectives on Societal Issues: Reframing the problems of ‘population aging’

Great Hall

Occupational scientists have proposed that an occupational perspective can offer new insights on societal issues that have both a particular local character and also transcend international boundaries. The aim of this workshop is to generate critical occupational perspectives on international concerns framed as ‘population aging’. Within various nations, population aging is often framed as a threat to societal and economic stability, and major policy changes are proposed or being made in areas such as health and pension policy. Three North American presenters with diverse international connections will spark dialogues on the challenges and opportunities for building connections with occupational scientists who do research on ‘population aging’ outside North America. The first part will consider how to connect with international colleagues on research methods that can raise critical perspectives about local occupational experiences of aging and the local and global governance that determines structural possibilities for aging well in diverse socio-cultural contexts. The second part will consider issues for publishing international, critical perspectives on ‘population aging’. The presenters will consider the issues for connecting occupational science research on ‘population aging’ in countries with and without taken-for-granted social supports which are being privatized under neo-liberal policies that accept class-based inequity. The presenters will use examples from their research to re-frame dialogue and policy on aging by prompting insights on occupational justice, governmental regulation of occupational possibilities and more. The anticipated workshop outcome is to stimulate dialogue and insights on the opportunities, benefits, and challenges in building and sustaining international, interdisciplinary, occupational science research collaborations – from building relationships to negotiating funding and satisfying ethical requirements for shared research projects and publications. The workshop implications are for participants to use the dialogue to expand their own international networks to study aging and other societal issues from a critical occupational perspective.