Title

Poster Session - Occupational Justice for Young Adults with Autism in Transition

Location

Winter Garden

Start Time

16-10-2014 6:00 PM

End Time

16-10-2014 9:00 PM

Abstract

In alignment with Globalization & Occupational Science: Partnerships, Methods & Research, my dissertation project aims to explore current gaps for transitioning youth with autism post-high school. Further research is indicated to provide policy makers with evidence-based research that supports appropriate programming to lessen the gap for young adults with disabilities to engage in adult life-fulfilling occupations that support employment and independent living. Three specific areas that warrant further explorations include post-secondary education, employment, and independent activities such as caring for one self at home or self-home ownership. All three of these activities are noted by Occupational Scientist and the World Health Organization to promote health and well-being.

The United States has initiated leadership efforts in ensuring humanity and equal rights and can become a partner with other advanced nations and a model for underdeveloped countries to open pathways for equal access and opportunity post childhood for individuals with disabilities. In the United States, legislation such as the Individuals with Disability Education Act have supported students with disabilities. This legislation can be a starting point to launch modern advocacy efforts to increase programs post-high school for students who need further support into adulthood to access jobs and community living so they too can maintain progress in adulthood like their same aged peers. In order to truly understand the details of current programs that are in existence to support the transition of high-school students with disabilities into adulthood make continued progress, rigorous qualitative studies are required to rule out the variables that quantitative studies cannot address; being insight into the phenomenon through the eyes and words of those who are living the experience of a transitional youth with autism.

In my upcoming 2013-2014 dissertation project for my Doctor of Science in Occupational Science program, I aim to explore the decision making process of young adults, ages 18-22, with autism regarding their future through qualitative research utilizing a case study design and framework of occupational justice. This case study is guided through the work of Yin (2003) and Stake (1995). The ultimate goal is to gain insight into the lives of at least 2-4 adults and to illuminate the challenges they face as they navigate their journey as members of society.

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Oct 16th, 6:00 PM Oct 16th, 9:00 PM

Poster Session - Occupational Justice for Young Adults with Autism in Transition

Winter Garden

In alignment with Globalization & Occupational Science: Partnerships, Methods & Research, my dissertation project aims to explore current gaps for transitioning youth with autism post-high school. Further research is indicated to provide policy makers with evidence-based research that supports appropriate programming to lessen the gap for young adults with disabilities to engage in adult life-fulfilling occupations that support employment and independent living. Three specific areas that warrant further explorations include post-secondary education, employment, and independent activities such as caring for one self at home or self-home ownership. All three of these activities are noted by Occupational Scientist and the World Health Organization to promote health and well-being.

The United States has initiated leadership efforts in ensuring humanity and equal rights and can become a partner with other advanced nations and a model for underdeveloped countries to open pathways for equal access and opportunity post childhood for individuals with disabilities. In the United States, legislation such as the Individuals with Disability Education Act have supported students with disabilities. This legislation can be a starting point to launch modern advocacy efforts to increase programs post-high school for students who need further support into adulthood to access jobs and community living so they too can maintain progress in adulthood like their same aged peers. In order to truly understand the details of current programs that are in existence to support the transition of high-school students with disabilities into adulthood make continued progress, rigorous qualitative studies are required to rule out the variables that quantitative studies cannot address; being insight into the phenomenon through the eyes and words of those who are living the experience of a transitional youth with autism.

In my upcoming 2013-2014 dissertation project for my Doctor of Science in Occupational Science program, I aim to explore the decision making process of young adults, ages 18-22, with autism regarding their future through qualitative research utilizing a case study design and framework of occupational justice. This case study is guided through the work of Yin (2003) and Stake (1995). The ultimate goal is to gain insight into the lives of at least 2-4 adults and to illuminate the challenges they face as they navigate their journey as members of society.