Title

Panel Presentation - Reflexivity in Qualitative Approaches: Uncovering multiple layers

Location

Rock Island

Start Time

17-10-2014 4:55 PM

End Time

17-10-2014 6:00 PM

Session Type

Panel

Abstract

Introduction

Laliberte-Rudman (2013) challenged us to view research as a moral and political responsibility full of challenging power relations that need to be explored and explicit. Thus, it is imperative for us a researchers and practitioners to understand and reflect on the multiple lenses in which we see the world. Too often views of illness, race/ethnicity, social economic class and religion are shaped within a cultural narrative that is full of myth, misinformation and bias. Current beliefs regarding qualitative methods underscore that discourse is varied and narratives are unique to individuals, as well as groups, and there is no general claim to authoritative knowledge (Denzin & Lincoln, 2013). As occupational scientists continue their involvement in qualitative research, it is essential that critical steps are taken to enhance rigor and meaningful outcomes (Frank & Polkinghorn, 2010). This panel presentation will discuss the importance of reflexivity in qualitative research. Examples from the panelist’s research and clinical practice will be used to illustrate best practice.

Participants will have an opportunity for reflection on their own socio-cultural lenses. Specific objectives for this panel presentation include 1. Understand the significance of enhancing qualitative research rigor, and 2. Build awareness regarding assumptions and how they can impact research.

Paper 1

Through understanding the experience of mothering young adult children with addictions, this study sought to explore the tension between mothering and the stigma of addiction. Mothers are often held responsible for their children’s behavior and their outcomes and fall prey to false ideals of perfect mothering. The author explores her assumptions of addiction and what is considered good mothering.

Paper 2

This paper will discuss the steps the author took in a series of qualitative studies related to mothering occupations among culturally diverse women. These included engaging in critical reflexivity, seeking out a role model, and re-framing the data reduction process with the use of antenarratology by Boje (1995).

Paper 3

Intensive clinical practice in the remote regions of the Navajo Nation in New Mexico has sharpened the author’s perspectives on the nature, meaning, and value of qualitative data. While making the journey from “outsider” (Kluckhon, 1966) to colleague and being given entrée into the most intimate family situations, the luxury of community immersion over time has allowed the author’s perceptions, biases and assumptions to evolve while informing clinical practice and the concept of occupation.

References

Boje, D.M. (1995). Stories of the storytelling organization: A postmodern analysis of Disney as Tamara-land. Academy of Management Journal, 38, 997-1035.

Denzin, N.K. & Lincoln, Y.S. (2013). Collecting and interpreting qualitative materials (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

Frank, G. & Polkinghorne, D. (2010). Qualitative research in occupational therapy: From the first to the second generation. OTJR, 30, 51-57.

Kluckhon, C. (1966). Ramah Navaho: Anthropological Papers. Washington, DC: United States Government Printing Office.

Laliberte-Rudman, D. (2013). Embracing and enacting ‘the occupational imagination’: Occupational science as transformative. The 2013 Ruth Zemke Lecture in Occupational Science.

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Oct 17th, 4:55 PM Oct 17th, 6:00 PM

Panel Presentation - Reflexivity in Qualitative Approaches: Uncovering multiple layers

Rock Island

Introduction

Laliberte-Rudman (2013) challenged us to view research as a moral and political responsibility full of challenging power relations that need to be explored and explicit. Thus, it is imperative for us a researchers and practitioners to understand and reflect on the multiple lenses in which we see the world. Too often views of illness, race/ethnicity, social economic class and religion are shaped within a cultural narrative that is full of myth, misinformation and bias. Current beliefs regarding qualitative methods underscore that discourse is varied and narratives are unique to individuals, as well as groups, and there is no general claim to authoritative knowledge (Denzin & Lincoln, 2013). As occupational scientists continue their involvement in qualitative research, it is essential that critical steps are taken to enhance rigor and meaningful outcomes (Frank & Polkinghorn, 2010). This panel presentation will discuss the importance of reflexivity in qualitative research. Examples from the panelist’s research and clinical practice will be used to illustrate best practice.

Participants will have an opportunity for reflection on their own socio-cultural lenses. Specific objectives for this panel presentation include 1. Understand the significance of enhancing qualitative research rigor, and 2. Build awareness regarding assumptions and how they can impact research.

Paper 1

Through understanding the experience of mothering young adult children with addictions, this study sought to explore the tension between mothering and the stigma of addiction. Mothers are often held responsible for their children’s behavior and their outcomes and fall prey to false ideals of perfect mothering. The author explores her assumptions of addiction and what is considered good mothering.

Paper 2

This paper will discuss the steps the author took in a series of qualitative studies related to mothering occupations among culturally diverse women. These included engaging in critical reflexivity, seeking out a role model, and re-framing the data reduction process with the use of antenarratology by Boje (1995).

Paper 3

Intensive clinical practice in the remote regions of the Navajo Nation in New Mexico has sharpened the author’s perspectives on the nature, meaning, and value of qualitative data. While making the journey from “outsider” (Kluckhon, 1966) to colleague and being given entrée into the most intimate family situations, the luxury of community immersion over time has allowed the author’s perceptions, biases and assumptions to evolve while informing clinical practice and the concept of occupation.