Title

Say cheese! Photo elicitation interviewing as a feasible method to capture children's perspectives on family routines

Location

Charles Frost

Start Time

17-10-2014 10:30 AM

End Time

17-10-2014 11:00 AM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Introduction: There is little research about the routines of typically developing school-aged children and even less investigating these concepts from the child’s perspective. These gaps may be attributed, in part, to difficulties interviewing children, their ability to accurately recall events, differences in language and communication styles, and the perceived power differential between child participants and adult researchers. Visual methodologies can mitigate some of these challenges while offering a deeper and richer understanding of the experiences of children. In particular, photographs can provide an artifact to assist memory and stimulate conversation while empowering children to lead the interview. Objectives: To explore the routines of typically developing school-aged children from the child’s perspective and to test Photo Elicitation Interviewing (PEI) methodology to determine the viability with this population. Methods: Eight children, ages 7-12, were asked to take photographs of their daily routines over a one week period. Consistent with PEI methodology, these photographs were explored with the child during a subsequent interview. Using a phenomenological framework, the interviews were individually coded by two researchers then analyzed and interpreted by a four-member research team to establish investigator triangulation and enhance trustworthiness. An audit trail was documented and both primary researchers maintained reflexive journals throughout the research process. Results: Three themes emerged from the data: orchestration of routines within the family unit and individual members’ contributions; weekend versus weekday routines; and PEI as a useful methodology for research with children. Conclusion: The orchestration of routines is essential for establishing roles, and developing responsibilities and collaboration. The temporal component of routines facilitates self-regulation and builds confidence by enabling competency. PEI methodology offers a unique perspective and a plethora of benefits when used with school-aged children. Most noticeably, PEI methodology is perceived to be fun, provides a richness of data, and assists with articulating abstract concepts. Eliciting the perspectives of children using PEI illuminates an authentic understanding of the meaning of their occupations and how these occupations affect their lives. This study provides evidence that PEI is a promising and viable research methodology for future studies investigating occupation among school-aged children.

Keywords: children, photo-elicitation, routines

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Oct 17th, 10:30 AM Oct 17th, 11:00 AM

Say cheese! Photo elicitation interviewing as a feasible method to capture children's perspectives on family routines

Charles Frost

Introduction: There is little research about the routines of typically developing school-aged children and even less investigating these concepts from the child’s perspective. These gaps may be attributed, in part, to difficulties interviewing children, their ability to accurately recall events, differences in language and communication styles, and the perceived power differential between child participants and adult researchers. Visual methodologies can mitigate some of these challenges while offering a deeper and richer understanding of the experiences of children. In particular, photographs can provide an artifact to assist memory and stimulate conversation while empowering children to lead the interview. Objectives: To explore the routines of typically developing school-aged children from the child’s perspective and to test Photo Elicitation Interviewing (PEI) methodology to determine the viability with this population. Methods: Eight children, ages 7-12, were asked to take photographs of their daily routines over a one week period. Consistent with PEI methodology, these photographs were explored with the child during a subsequent interview. Using a phenomenological framework, the interviews were individually coded by two researchers then analyzed and interpreted by a four-member research team to establish investigator triangulation and enhance trustworthiness. An audit trail was documented and both primary researchers maintained reflexive journals throughout the research process. Results: Three themes emerged from the data: orchestration of routines within the family unit and individual members’ contributions; weekend versus weekday routines; and PEI as a useful methodology for research with children. Conclusion: The orchestration of routines is essential for establishing roles, and developing responsibilities and collaboration. The temporal component of routines facilitates self-regulation and builds confidence by enabling competency. PEI methodology offers a unique perspective and a plethora of benefits when used with school-aged children. Most noticeably, PEI methodology is perceived to be fun, provides a richness of data, and assists with articulating abstract concepts. Eliciting the perspectives of children using PEI illuminates an authentic understanding of the meaning of their occupations and how these occupations affect their lives. This study provides evidence that PEI is a promising and viable research methodology for future studies investigating occupation among school-aged children.

Keywords: children, photo-elicitation, routines