Title

Panel Presentation - Bridging the individual-collective divide: Examination of ‘mid-range’ social analytic units

Location

Hiawatha 2

Start Time

17-10-2014 4:55 PM

End Time

17-10-2014 6:00 PM

Session Type

Panel

Abstract

The growing critical discourse in occupational science pertaining to the ‘polarity’ of scholarship as individualistic or collective marks an important developmental moment in the evolution of the science. When this ‘either-or’ tension is privileged, the under-theorized reality that individuals live and engage with one another in multiple cultural worlds is obscured (i.e. Dickie, Cutchin, & Humphrey, 2006; Laliberte Rudman, 2013). This panel will present the theoretical underpinnings of analytic units with particular attention to a unit of analysis that captures 'mid-range' social engagements (Lawlor, Park, & Huecker). Drawing on narrative and ethnographic data, panelists will present three papers that address the ‘boundary crossing’ nature of studying people in their diverse contextual realties and highlight how this analytic unit could further occupational science.

In the first paper, the author will present a conceptual framework for understanding the 'mid-range' social engagements that permeate daily life (e.g. family life, working on interdisciplinary teams, being in a classroom). These 'mid-range' social units fall between the individual or dyadic modes of understanding engagement and the larger collectives theorized in much of contemporary social theory. Ethnographic examples related to family life will be used to illustrate how this proposed unit of analysis contributes to understandings of interdependent aspects of living and learning in daily life.

In spite of advocacy for engagement in social contexts, tensions remain when children with disabilities approach participation (Hammell, 2013). The second paper draws on ethnographic data from a 15-year longitudinal study to illuminate the role of stigma in social participation for African American children with disabilities. Narrative accounts of family experiences reveal themes of marginalization, which expand beyond dyads of mother and child to affect social connections at home and within school and community groups.

The third paper describes an ethnographic study of occupational therapy students traveling abroad for a short-term immersion in a developing country. The primary unit of analysis was the narrative representations of the students’ experiences; however their stories are nested in the legacy of global education opportunities which many post-secondary institutions endorse. Using person-centered ethnography (Hollan, 1997) as a methodological and analytic tool, the voices of the students speak not only to the potential for personal transformation, but also to larger issues of globalization, service and cultural intersubjectivity (Hammell, 2013).

References

  1. Dickie, V., Cutchin, M., & Humphrey, R. (2006). Occupation as a transactional experience: A critique of individualism in occupational science. Journal of Occupational Science, 13, 83-93.
  2. Laliberte Rudman, D. (2013). Enacting the critical potential of occupational science: Problematizing the ‘individualizing of occupation. Journal of Occupational Science, 20(4), 298-313.
  3. Lawlor, M., Park, M. & Huecker, E. Understanding occupations in daily life: Constructing analytic frames (manuscript).
  4. Hammell, K. R. W. (2013). Occupation, well-being, and culture: Theory and cultural humility. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 80(4), 224-234.
  5. Hollan, D. (1997). The relevance of person-centered ethnography to cross-cultural psychiatry. Transcultural Psychiatry, 34(2), 219-234.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 17th, 4:55 PM Oct 17th, 6:00 PM

Panel Presentation - Bridging the individual-collective divide: Examination of ‘mid-range’ social analytic units

Hiawatha 2

The growing critical discourse in occupational science pertaining to the ‘polarity’ of scholarship as individualistic or collective marks an important developmental moment in the evolution of the science. When this ‘either-or’ tension is privileged, the under-theorized reality that individuals live and engage with one another in multiple cultural worlds is obscured (i.e. Dickie, Cutchin, & Humphrey, 2006; Laliberte Rudman, 2013). This panel will present the theoretical underpinnings of analytic units with particular attention to a unit of analysis that captures 'mid-range' social engagements (Lawlor, Park, & Huecker). Drawing on narrative and ethnographic data, panelists will present three papers that address the ‘boundary crossing’ nature of studying people in their diverse contextual realties and highlight how this analytic unit could further occupational science.

In the first paper, the author will present a conceptual framework for understanding the 'mid-range' social engagements that permeate daily life (e.g. family life, working on interdisciplinary teams, being in a classroom). These 'mid-range' social units fall between the individual or dyadic modes of understanding engagement and the larger collectives theorized in much of contemporary social theory. Ethnographic examples related to family life will be used to illustrate how this proposed unit of analysis contributes to understandings of interdependent aspects of living and learning in daily life.

In spite of advocacy for engagement in social contexts, tensions remain when children with disabilities approach participation (Hammell, 2013). The second paper draws on ethnographic data from a 15-year longitudinal study to illuminate the role of stigma in social participation for African American children with disabilities. Narrative accounts of family experiences reveal themes of marginalization, which expand beyond dyads of mother and child to affect social connections at home and within school and community groups.

The third paper describes an ethnographic study of occupational therapy students traveling abroad for a short-term immersion in a developing country. The primary unit of analysis was the narrative representations of the students’ experiences; however their stories are nested in the legacy of global education opportunities which many post-secondary institutions endorse. Using person-centered ethnography (Hollan, 1997) as a methodological and analytic tool, the voices of the students speak not only to the potential for personal transformation, but also to larger issues of globalization, service and cultural intersubjectivity (Hammell, 2013).