Title

CSOS Townsend-Polatajko Lectureship - Work Mobility: Past Meanings and Future Horizons Implications for Canadians and Occupational Science

Presenter Information

Lynn Shaw, Western University

Location

Great Hall

Start Time

18-10-2014 8:30 AM

End Time

18-10-2014 10:00 AM

Session Type

Event

Abstract

Work Mobility denotes movement and change in both a literal and metaphoric sense. Work mobility manifests opportunities for economic prosperity as well as disparities. This concept is also about transformative opportunities and inequities in access to employment in contemporary world of work. Daily discourses that raise awareness of work mobility are most commonly known through the reporting of the fluctuations in unemployment rates within the formal economy or the movement of work sectors or organizations out of province or country. Little attention is focused on other scales of mobility such as the movement into or within the informal or underground work economies, or the uptake of risk laden work, or the questioning of the rise in underemployment for those completing higher education, or the contribution and effort of workers to the economy. Moreover, there is a lack of research focused on what people will do in terms of employment or what or how futures research might be conducted to open up alterative options for inclusive work participation. New ways of considering what people will do or have options to do or how persons of diversity can participate in future work may assist policy makers, educators, economists and employers in fostering human resources that are able to respond to the flexible and changing work opportunities. Occupational science knowledge can contribute to interdisciplinary insight needed to tackle these critical societal issues through raising awareness and acknowledging the past, challenging hegemonic views on present work mobility and focusing on how work meanings shape human engagement in work or act as catalysts for change. Canada is one country concerned about the social security of young people and future economic growth. Currently, the uncertainty of work for young people, the underemployment of our post- secondary graduates and the drop in participation in employment of persons with disabilities that have completed higher education are of concern to the federal and provincial labour ministries as well as many parents who question ‘What will our children do? What kind of work will be available to them?” This lecture will focus on one approach that occupational scientists might consider to open the door to new ways of understanding what people ‘will do’ using work as the occupation of inquiry. Part of futures research involves looking across vertical and horizontal dimensions and intersections of discourses as well as valuing different ways of knowing to unravel assumptions that reveal new possibilities for the future. One part of this method involves the use of myths and metaphors. This lecture focuses on the literary arts -Canadian songs about work mobility and work meanings. The discourses of Canadian composers and singers are used to look back, examine and understand work meanings, how work mobility has been shaped and how workers have contributed to change. This discourse forms the backdrop to developing myths and metaphors to open up new ideas in the journey toward dealing with uncertainties about the future of work.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 18th, 8:30 AM Oct 18th, 10:00 AM

CSOS Townsend-Polatajko Lectureship - Work Mobility: Past Meanings and Future Horizons Implications for Canadians and Occupational Science

Great Hall

Work Mobility denotes movement and change in both a literal and metaphoric sense. Work mobility manifests opportunities for economic prosperity as well as disparities. This concept is also about transformative opportunities and inequities in access to employment in contemporary world of work. Daily discourses that raise awareness of work mobility are most commonly known through the reporting of the fluctuations in unemployment rates within the formal economy or the movement of work sectors or organizations out of province or country. Little attention is focused on other scales of mobility such as the movement into or within the informal or underground work economies, or the uptake of risk laden work, or the questioning of the rise in underemployment for those completing higher education, or the contribution and effort of workers to the economy. Moreover, there is a lack of research focused on what people will do in terms of employment or what or how futures research might be conducted to open up alterative options for inclusive work participation. New ways of considering what people will do or have options to do or how persons of diversity can participate in future work may assist policy makers, educators, economists and employers in fostering human resources that are able to respond to the flexible and changing work opportunities. Occupational science knowledge can contribute to interdisciplinary insight needed to tackle these critical societal issues through raising awareness and acknowledging the past, challenging hegemonic views on present work mobility and focusing on how work meanings shape human engagement in work or act as catalysts for change. Canada is one country concerned about the social security of young people and future economic growth. Currently, the uncertainty of work for young people, the underemployment of our post- secondary graduates and the drop in participation in employment of persons with disabilities that have completed higher education are of concern to the federal and provincial labour ministries as well as many parents who question ‘What will our children do? What kind of work will be available to them?” This lecture will focus on one approach that occupational scientists might consider to open the door to new ways of understanding what people ‘will do’ using work as the occupation of inquiry. Part of futures research involves looking across vertical and horizontal dimensions and intersections of discourses as well as valuing different ways of knowing to unravel assumptions that reveal new possibilities for the future. One part of this method involves the use of myths and metaphors. This lecture focuses on the literary arts -Canadian songs about work mobility and work meanings. The discourses of Canadian composers and singers are used to look back, examine and understand work meanings, how work mobility has been shaped and how workers have contributed to change. This discourse forms the backdrop to developing myths and metaphors to open up new ideas in the journey toward dealing with uncertainties about the future of work.