Title

Panel Presentation - Conceptualizing Occupational Justice Globally: Present Understandings and Future Directions

Location

Hiawatha 2

Start Time

18-10-2014 2:20 PM

End Time

18-10-2014 3:25 PM

Session Type

Panel

Abstract

Both occupational science (OS) and occupational therapy (OT) share core beliefs related to human dignity, rights, and social inclusion (Frank, 2012; Whiteford & Townsend, 2011). Of concern to both, then, is the promotion of occupational justice. This international panel will review how occupational justice has been conceptualized, articulated, and operationalized in OS and OT. Then empirical data will be used to show how occupational injustices can arise inadvertently through the intersection of sociopolitical structures and discourses and from policy-driven processes. These ‘on the ground’ situations will be used to ‘think with,’ highlighting current challenges to operationalizing occupational justice. Discussion will focus on future directions for promoting occupational justice in practice.

First, a meta-synthesis of the results of a scoping review (Durocher, 2013) and a systematic mapping review of justice articulations in OS and OT literature will show the diverse ways that justice has been conceptualized.

Next, a Canadian study of discharge planning with older adults will show how the intersection of social and political forces can result in occupational injustice. Discharge planning from inpatient care involves the decision of where individuals will live upon discharge, which can have significant implications determining available opportunities and how and by whom needs will be met. In one older adult inpatient rehabilitation setting, co-constituting underlying beliefs about aging as decline and the primacy of healthcare professionals’ knowledge intersected with conventions in discharge planning processes and practices to maximize safety resulting in the marginalization of older adults in their own discharge decisions as they were disallowed from making decisions deemed “risky” by others.

Next, a study on the Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) will reveal how occupational possibilities were promoted and situated within the institutional ethos. The NDIS, labelled the biggest social policy reform since the introduction of Medicare in the 1970s, aimed to provide support and foster capability enablement for people living with severe and profound disability through opportunities for social inclusion and individualised funding. Analysis of the NDIS from a critical occupational science perspective reveals how the NDIS facilitates occupational justice in practice and highlights areas of future development.

Discussion will focus on how to move concepts of occupational justice into the practice realm, focusing on the intersection of practice, policy and research championed within occupation-based disciplines.

Key words: Occupational justice; theory; practice; policy

References

Durocher, E., Rappolt, S., & Gibson, B.E. (2013): Occupational Justice: Future Directions, Journal of Occupational Science, DOI:10.1080/14427591.2013.775693

Frank, G. (2012). The 2010 Ruth Zemke Lecture in Occupational Science

Occupational Therapy/Occupational Science/Occupational Justice: Moral Commitments and Global Assemblages, Journal of Occupational Science, 19:1, 25-35.

Whiteford, G., & Townsend, E. (2011). Participatory Occupational Justice Framework [POJF:2010]: Enabling occupational participation and inclusion. In F. Kronenberg, N. Pollard, & D. Sakellariou [Eds.], Occupational therapies without borders. Volume 2: Towards an ecology of occupation-based practices [pp. 65-84]. London, England: Elsevier.

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Oct 18th, 2:20 PM Oct 18th, 3:25 PM

Panel Presentation - Conceptualizing Occupational Justice Globally: Present Understandings and Future Directions

Hiawatha 2

Both occupational science (OS) and occupational therapy (OT) share core beliefs related to human dignity, rights, and social inclusion (Frank, 2012; Whiteford & Townsend, 2011). Of concern to both, then, is the promotion of occupational justice. This international panel will review how occupational justice has been conceptualized, articulated, and operationalized in OS and OT. Then empirical data will be used to show how occupational injustices can arise inadvertently through the intersection of sociopolitical structures and discourses and from policy-driven processes. These ‘on the ground’ situations will be used to ‘think with,’ highlighting current challenges to operationalizing occupational justice. Discussion will focus on future directions for promoting occupational justice in practice.

First, a meta-synthesis of the results of a scoping review (Durocher, 2013) and a systematic mapping review of justice articulations in OS and OT literature will show the diverse ways that justice has been conceptualized.

Next, a Canadian study of discharge planning with older adults will show how the intersection of social and political forces can result in occupational injustice. Discharge planning from inpatient care involves the decision of where individuals will live upon discharge, which can have significant implications determining available opportunities and how and by whom needs will be met. In one older adult inpatient rehabilitation setting, co-constituting underlying beliefs about aging as decline and the primacy of healthcare professionals’ knowledge intersected with conventions in discharge planning processes and practices to maximize safety resulting in the marginalization of older adults in their own discharge decisions as they were disallowed from making decisions deemed “risky” by others.

Next, a study on the Australian National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) will reveal how occupational possibilities were promoted and situated within the institutional ethos. The NDIS, labelled the biggest social policy reform since the introduction of Medicare in the 1970s, aimed to provide support and foster capability enablement for people living with severe and profound disability through opportunities for social inclusion and individualised funding. Analysis of the NDIS from a critical occupational science perspective reveals how the NDIS facilitates occupational justice in practice and highlights areas of future development.

Discussion will focus on how to move concepts of occupational justice into the practice realm, focusing on the intersection of practice, policy and research championed within occupation-based disciplines.

Key words: Occupational justice; theory; practice; policy