Title

Panel Presentation - Pursuing Health in a Global City: Latino Angelenos' Participation in Health-Related Occupations

Location

Hiawatha 2

Start Time

18-10-2014 1:10 PM

End Time

18-10-2014 2:15 PM

Session Type

Panel

Abstract

Key Words: Globalization, immigration, healthcare

Background: Global cities are worldwide hubs of economic, cultural, and political activity; they attract immigrants from around the world and often develop high levels of socioeconomic inequality (Sassen, 2005). Los Angeles is one such city, in which more than a third of residents are foreign-born (over half of whom are from Latin America) and a quarter of residents are in poverty. These circumstances of diversity and inequality affect the performance of everyday occupations, in some cases contributing to occupational deprivation and injustice.

Purpose: This panel will explore how globalization impacts engagement in health-related occupations (e.g., navigating health systems, interacting with healthcare professionals, and implementing treatment) among Latinos living in Los Angeles.

Approach: We will present case examples from three related projects which investigated the performance of health-related occupations among Latinos with various health conditions:

  • A qualitative study, drawing on narrative and phenomenological approaches, investigating how young adults with diabetes integrate disease management into their everyday occupations;
  • A randomized controlled trial investigating a lifestyle intervention to prevent pressure ulcers among adults with spinal cord injury; and
  • A qualitative study investigating the challenges and daily experiences of Latino families with a child with autism.

The case examples extracted from these three studies are analyzed through a transactional theoretical perspective (Dickie, Cutchin & Humphry, 2006), emphasizing the interdependence of people and their environment in shaping occupational engagement.

Results: Latinos’ performance of health-related occupations were influenced by a multitude of factors related to globalization. Some of these included language, immigration status, economic constraints due to limited employment opportunities, and the capacity of healthcare providers and health systems to provide culturally competent, accessible, and affordable care. For example, low-status employment restricted many participants’ abilities to attend health-related appointments or perform self-care occupations (Vaishampayan, Clark, Carlson & Blanche, 2011). Participants who interfaced with overburdened healthcare systems developed creative strategies to access healthcare, such as lying about symptom severity or need for medications.

Conclusions: Latinos’ participation in health-related occupations in a global city provides a vivid illustration of how the interplay between person and context shapes occupational performance. Exploring health-related occupations from a transactional perspective contributes to our understanding of how individual, community-level, and societal factors interact to influence the performance of these occupations.

References

Dickie, V., Cutchin, M. P., & Humphry, R. (2006). Occupation as transactional experience: A critique of individualism in occupational science. Journal of Occupational Science, 13(1), 83-93.

Sassen, S. (2005). The Global City: Introducing a Concept. Brown Journal of World Affairs, 11(2), 27-43.

Vaishamapayan, A., Clark, F., Carlson, M., & Blanche, E. I. (2011). Preventing pressure ulcers in people with spinal cord injury: Targeting risky life circumstances through community-based interventions. Advances in Skin and Wound Care, 24(6), 275-284.

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Oct 18th, 1:10 PM Oct 18th, 2:15 PM

Panel Presentation - Pursuing Health in a Global City: Latino Angelenos' Participation in Health-Related Occupations

Hiawatha 2

Key Words: Globalization, immigration, healthcare

Background: Global cities are worldwide hubs of economic, cultural, and political activity; they attract immigrants from around the world and often develop high levels of socioeconomic inequality (Sassen, 2005). Los Angeles is one such city, in which more than a third of residents are foreign-born (over half of whom are from Latin America) and a quarter of residents are in poverty. These circumstances of diversity and inequality affect the performance of everyday occupations, in some cases contributing to occupational deprivation and injustice.

Purpose: This panel will explore how globalization impacts engagement in health-related occupations (e.g., navigating health systems, interacting with healthcare professionals, and implementing treatment) among Latinos living in Los Angeles.

Approach: We will present case examples from three related projects which investigated the performance of health-related occupations among Latinos with various health conditions:

  • A qualitative study, drawing on narrative and phenomenological approaches, investigating how young adults with diabetes integrate disease management into their everyday occupations;
  • A randomized controlled trial investigating a lifestyle intervention to prevent pressure ulcers among adults with spinal cord injury; and
  • A qualitative study investigating the challenges and daily experiences of Latino families with a child with autism.

The case examples extracted from these three studies are analyzed through a transactional theoretical perspective (Dickie, Cutchin & Humphry, 2006), emphasizing the interdependence of people and their environment in shaping occupational engagement.

Results: Latinos’ performance of health-related occupations were influenced by a multitude of factors related to globalization. Some of these included language, immigration status, economic constraints due to limited employment opportunities, and the capacity of healthcare providers and health systems to provide culturally competent, accessible, and affordable care. For example, low-status employment restricted many participants’ abilities to attend health-related appointments or perform self-care occupations (Vaishampayan, Clark, Carlson & Blanche, 2011). Participants who interfaced with overburdened healthcare systems developed creative strategies to access healthcare, such as lying about symptom severity or need for medications.

Conclusions: Latinos’ participation in health-related occupations in a global city provides a vivid illustration of how the interplay between person and context shapes occupational performance. Exploring health-related occupations from a transactional perspective contributes to our understanding of how individual, community-level, and societal factors interact to influence the performance of these occupations.