Title

A Critical Analysis of Our Knowledge of Participation: Have Occupational Scientists Neglected Key Occupational Domains?

Location

Charles Frost

Start Time

18-10-2014 1:45 PM

End Time

18-10-2014 2:15 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Introduction

The World Health Organization asserts that participation, as conceptualized in the International Classification of Functioning (ICF), is the outcome of health services. Occupational science supports that global vision and seeks to advance the evidence for this assertion by generating knowledge of participation in occupation. It is unclear, however, whether our knowledge of occupation encompasses participation and meaningfully connects across all ICF chapters (Learning and applying knowledge; general tasks and demands; communication; mobility; self-care; domestic life; interpersonal interactions and relationships; major life areas; community, social and civic life). If some are neglected, health services will lack the knowledge required for effective participation interventions in those domains.

Purpose

To identify research priorities by auditing current knowledge of participation in occupation and critically analyzing the importance of identified gaps.

Methods

An audit of volumes 1-20 of the Journal of Occupational Science (JOS) was completed, to identify findings related to participation and its relationship to health and map them onto the ICF activities and participation chapters. The inclusion criterion was articles reporting research findings or synthesizing literature to generate new understandings of occupation.

Results

The number of articles published in JOS that add to knowledge of participation is reported, as a whole and across the ICF participation chapters. Areas of concentration of knowledge development, and areas of neglect, are reported and the implications for occupational science, occupational therapists and health service provision are critically interpreted.

Contribution to Occupational Science

The audit supports the planned development of occupational science by drawing attention to participation domains where knowledge is concentrated and where further research is needed. The findings will inform occupational scientists, health care providers and policy directions seeking to focus on participation as a primary health outcome. The study identifies areas where relatively substantial evidence exists, and where there is a need to interpret the broader literature to understand the value and meaningful connections of participation in occupation and its contribution to health.

Key words

Research priorities, ICF, participation

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Oct 18th, 1:45 PM Oct 18th, 2:15 PM

A Critical Analysis of Our Knowledge of Participation: Have Occupational Scientists Neglected Key Occupational Domains?

Charles Frost

Introduction

The World Health Organization asserts that participation, as conceptualized in the International Classification of Functioning (ICF), is the outcome of health services. Occupational science supports that global vision and seeks to advance the evidence for this assertion by generating knowledge of participation in occupation. It is unclear, however, whether our knowledge of occupation encompasses participation and meaningfully connects across all ICF chapters (Learning and applying knowledge; general tasks and demands; communication; mobility; self-care; domestic life; interpersonal interactions and relationships; major life areas; community, social and civic life). If some are neglected, health services will lack the knowledge required for effective participation interventions in those domains.

Purpose

To identify research priorities by auditing current knowledge of participation in occupation and critically analyzing the importance of identified gaps.

Methods

An audit of volumes 1-20 of the Journal of Occupational Science (JOS) was completed, to identify findings related to participation and its relationship to health and map them onto the ICF activities and participation chapters. The inclusion criterion was articles reporting research findings or synthesizing literature to generate new understandings of occupation.

Results

The number of articles published in JOS that add to knowledge of participation is reported, as a whole and across the ICF participation chapters. Areas of concentration of knowledge development, and areas of neglect, are reported and the implications for occupational science, occupational therapists and health service provision are critically interpreted.

Contribution to Occupational Science

The audit supports the planned development of occupational science by drawing attention to participation domains where knowledge is concentrated and where further research is needed. The findings will inform occupational scientists, health care providers and policy directions seeking to focus on participation as a primary health outcome. The study identifies areas where relatively substantial evidence exists, and where there is a need to interpret the broader literature to understand the value and meaningful connections of participation in occupation and its contribution to health.

Key words

Research priorities, ICF, participation