Title

Quality of life in people with Parkinson’s disease: A q-methodology analysis

Location

Charles Frost

Start Time

18-10-2014 11:40 AM

End Time

18-10-2014 12:10 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this research study was to describe quality of life, for persons with Parkinson’s disease (PD) through the q methodology (Brown, 1993) and, specifically through the administration of the q-sort by Palombi et al. (2010). This study was an international collaboration that originated at the CSOS/SSO:USA conference in London, Ontario in 2010.

METHODS: Twenty-six persons with Idiopathic PD participated in this study. The q-sort, developed by Palombi, Corr, and Bartolomucci (2010), was administered to each participant, who completed it based on his or her perceptions of quality of life.

RESULTS: The statistical analysis resulted in three factors: Factor 1) Accept, cope, and contribute; Factor 2) Enriched sense of self and relationships; and Factor 3) Maintaining control and keeping dignity. Factor 1 showed that quality of life is being able to accept and cope to one’s situation while actively contributing to society. Being able to contribute to society may be a coping strategy for individuals in this factor, as they focus on what they can do instead of what they are unable to do. Factor 2 reflects how spirituality may dictate how one views themselves and their role as a member of their family. Although family and friends are important, individuals in factor 2 value independence and the ability to provide for others that are close rather than to be a burden. Factor 3 reflected the importance of being in control of one’s life by maintaining physical, emotional and intellectual functioning. This factor also shows the importance of preserving personal dignity through control of their own body, despite the presence of PD.

CONCLUSION: It is valuable for occupational scientists to understand how one defines quality of life when considering the lives of people with PD. Occupations that are consistent with an individual person’s quality of life factor or axis, may hold more meaning and potential to affect his or her health. In addition, promoting a holistic understanding of this population’s quality of life can assist the practice of occupational therapy in its effort to be more client-centered. Lastly, q-methodology is a valuable research approach that provides insights into people’s subjective experiences by combining the best of both qualitative and quantitative design (Barker, 2008).

KEYWORDS: Q-methodology, coping, relationships

References

Brown, S. (1993). A primer on Q methodology. Operant Subjectivity, 16, 91-138.

Barker, J. (2008). Q-methodology: An alternative approach to research in nurse education. Nurse Education Today. 28, 917-925.

Palombi, A., Corr, S., & Bartolomucci, E. (2010). Establishing the perceptions of quality of life of individuals with neurological conditions using Q–methodology. Unpublished manuscript, Istituto Chirurgico Traumatologico Ortopedico, Latina, Italy.

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Oct 18th, 11:40 AM Oct 18th, 12:10 PM

Quality of life in people with Parkinson’s disease: A q-methodology analysis

Charles Frost

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this research study was to describe quality of life, for persons with Parkinson’s disease (PD) through the q methodology (Brown, 1993) and, specifically through the administration of the q-sort by Palombi et al. (2010). This study was an international collaboration that originated at the CSOS/SSO:USA conference in London, Ontario in 2010.

METHODS: Twenty-six persons with Idiopathic PD participated in this study. The q-sort, developed by Palombi, Corr, and Bartolomucci (2010), was administered to each participant, who completed it based on his or her perceptions of quality of life.

RESULTS: The statistical analysis resulted in three factors: Factor 1) Accept, cope, and contribute; Factor 2) Enriched sense of self and relationships; and Factor 3) Maintaining control and keeping dignity. Factor 1 showed that quality of life is being able to accept and cope to one’s situation while actively contributing to society. Being able to contribute to society may be a coping strategy for individuals in this factor, as they focus on what they can do instead of what they are unable to do. Factor 2 reflects how spirituality may dictate how one views themselves and their role as a member of their family. Although family and friends are important, individuals in factor 2 value independence and the ability to provide for others that are close rather than to be a burden. Factor 3 reflected the importance of being in control of one’s life by maintaining physical, emotional and intellectual functioning. This factor also shows the importance of preserving personal dignity through control of their own body, despite the presence of PD.

CONCLUSION: It is valuable for occupational scientists to understand how one defines quality of life when considering the lives of people with PD. Occupations that are consistent with an individual person’s quality of life factor or axis, may hold more meaning and potential to affect his or her health. In addition, promoting a holistic understanding of this population’s quality of life can assist the practice of occupational therapy in its effort to be more client-centered. Lastly, q-methodology is a valuable research approach that provides insights into people’s subjective experiences by combining the best of both qualitative and quantitative design (Barker, 2008).

KEYWORDS: Q-methodology, coping, relationships