Title

To engage or not to engage; the influence of meaningfulness in decision-making.

Location

Hiawatha 1

Start Time

18-10-2014 11:40 AM

End Time

18-10-2014 12:10 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Background and Rationale: The decision to engage in an occupation is influenced by choice and control over the decision as well as the meaning attributed to engaging in the occupation. This grounded theory study explored this decision making process for people who use power tilt wheelchairs, particularly the influence of using tilt to address physical needs, which arise during occupational engagement. For people who use power tilt wheelchairs, the spontaneous reaction of moving their bodies in response to physical needs such as discomfort, poor postural alignment or pressure, can be enabled through the power tilt feature. Using power tilt to move their body is a means to reduce the risk of developing secondary health issues such as pressure ulcers which subsequently can reduce engagement in occupations. However, current research literature found that people who use power tilt do so inconsistently and infrequently throughout the day. Purpose: Current research did not explore the reasons for low use of power tilt but alluded to the presence of tension between engaging in daily occupations and using power tilt. Applying an occupational lens, this grounded theory research study aimed to explore this tension. Methods: Using a constant comparative approach, the perspectives of 5 people who use power tilt wheelchairs and 6 therapists who prescribed this technology were gathered through multiple interviews and a 3 day journal. This iterative approach to data collection and analysis enabled the exploration of the process by which addressing physical needs were integrated with engagement in daily occupations. Results: The substantive theory generated from this study elucidates the complexity of occupational engagement across the course of the day particularly as engagement is challenged by competing needs. Personal meaning placed on engaging in the occupation in the context at that point in time, shaped the decisions to prioritize occupation over physical needs, to modify occupations so as to accommodate physical needs or to interrupt, stop or change occupations in order to address physical needs. Conclusion: This substantive theory advances the understanding of occupational engagement by blending occupational and bio-medical perspectives. The theory elucidates the powerful influence context, choice, control, and attribution of meaning to an occupation have on the process of deciding to engage or remain engaged in an occupation when competing physical needs arise.

3 Key words: Meaningfulness; Occupational engagement; Grounded theory

References

Aldrich, R. (2008). From Complexity theory to transactionalism: Moving occupational science forward in theorizing the complexities of behavior. Journal of Occupational Science, 15(3), 147-156.

Corbin, J. & Strauss, A. (2008). Basics of Qualitative Research: Techniques and Procedures for Developing Grounded Theory (3rd ed.).Thousand Oaks,CA: Sage

Miller Polgar, J., & Landry, J.E. (2004). Occupations as a means for individual and group participation in life. In C. Christiansen, & E. Townsend (Eds.), Introduction to Occupation: The Art and Science of Living (pp.197-220). Prentice Hall:New JerseyUSA.

Sonenblum, S., Sprigle, S., & Maurer, C. (2009). Use of power tilt in everyday life. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 4(1), 24-30.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 18th, 11:40 AM Oct 18th, 12:10 PM

To engage or not to engage; the influence of meaningfulness in decision-making.

Hiawatha 1

Background and Rationale: The decision to engage in an occupation is influenced by choice and control over the decision as well as the meaning attributed to engaging in the occupation. This grounded theory study explored this decision making process for people who use power tilt wheelchairs, particularly the influence of using tilt to address physical needs, which arise during occupational engagement. For people who use power tilt wheelchairs, the spontaneous reaction of moving their bodies in response to physical needs such as discomfort, poor postural alignment or pressure, can be enabled through the power tilt feature. Using power tilt to move their body is a means to reduce the risk of developing secondary health issues such as pressure ulcers which subsequently can reduce engagement in occupations. However, current research literature found that people who use power tilt do so inconsistently and infrequently throughout the day. Purpose: Current research did not explore the reasons for low use of power tilt but alluded to the presence of tension between engaging in daily occupations and using power tilt. Applying an occupational lens, this grounded theory research study aimed to explore this tension. Methods: Using a constant comparative approach, the perspectives of 5 people who use power tilt wheelchairs and 6 therapists who prescribed this technology were gathered through multiple interviews and a 3 day journal. This iterative approach to data collection and analysis enabled the exploration of the process by which addressing physical needs were integrated with engagement in daily occupations. Results: The substantive theory generated from this study elucidates the complexity of occupational engagement across the course of the day particularly as engagement is challenged by competing needs. Personal meaning placed on engaging in the occupation in the context at that point in time, shaped the decisions to prioritize occupation over physical needs, to modify occupations so as to accommodate physical needs or to interrupt, stop or change occupations in order to address physical needs. Conclusion: This substantive theory advances the understanding of occupational engagement by blending occupational and bio-medical perspectives. The theory elucidates the powerful influence context, choice, control, and attribution of meaning to an occupation have on the process of deciding to engage or remain engaged in an occupation when competing physical needs arise.

3 Key words: Meaningfulness; Occupational engagement; Grounded theory