Title

Prisoner at home or active community participant: Exploring factors that influence public transport service provision for persons with disabilities in the eThekwini district, South Africa.

Location

Rock Island

Start Time

18-10-2014 1:10 PM

End Time

18-10-2014 1:40 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Persons with disabilities experience occupational injustices regarding transport participation. Since transport is an occupation as well as a means to achieving other occupations, accessible transport is the passport to independence. Unfortunately however, for many individuals the structural, societal, political and economic barriers continue to limit persons with disabilities in achieving integration in society. This study explores the factors that influence public transport service provision for persons with disabilities in the eThekwini district, a municipal area in South Africa.

A qualitative design was employed with purposive sampling of persons with mobility, visual and hearing impairments, transport operators, one transport (taxi) owner, two city officials, two consultants, one academic focusing on transport and one disability expert. The researcher used semi-structured interviews and three focus groups within the design. They were digitally recorded, transcribed and reviewed by either one or two independent persons for accuracy. Two of them were reviewed by the original interviewee. The transcriptions were analyzed using Nvivo 10. A conceptual framework was made by the researcher. Based on deductive reasoning, the researcher created ‘broad-brush’ coding to organize the material into topics. A second and third phase of data analysis was done and nodes were created using topic coding and analytical coding. Thematic analysis was then completed.

Reliability was ensured by using the same researcher for all the interviews and focus groups. Additional, when a translator was required, the same translator was utilized, who also had an in-depth understanding of the nature of disability. Confirmability was ensured by conclusions having a strong link between supporting literature and the data gained throughout the research process.

The results indicate that persons with disabilities experience occupational marginalization, apartheid, deprivation and limited occupational choice leading to occupational injustice. This is through inaccessibility, power dynamics, lack of compassion, safety concerns and the influence of money. Unless an occupational injustice framework is applied to policy creation, many of these additional barriers will remain unresolved and not addressed. This thus highlights the importance of occupational science framework in multi-stakeholder and departmental planning. This will enable meaningful connections across disciplines and sectors and further increase the dimensionality of occupational science.

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Oct 18th, 1:10 PM Oct 18th, 1:40 PM

Prisoner at home or active community participant: Exploring factors that influence public transport service provision for persons with disabilities in the eThekwini district, South Africa.

Rock Island

Persons with disabilities experience occupational injustices regarding transport participation. Since transport is an occupation as well as a means to achieving other occupations, accessible transport is the passport to independence. Unfortunately however, for many individuals the structural, societal, political and economic barriers continue to limit persons with disabilities in achieving integration in society. This study explores the factors that influence public transport service provision for persons with disabilities in the eThekwini district, a municipal area in South Africa.

A qualitative design was employed with purposive sampling of persons with mobility, visual and hearing impairments, transport operators, one transport (taxi) owner, two city officials, two consultants, one academic focusing on transport and one disability expert. The researcher used semi-structured interviews and three focus groups within the design. They were digitally recorded, transcribed and reviewed by either one or two independent persons for accuracy. Two of them were reviewed by the original interviewee. The transcriptions were analyzed using Nvivo 10. A conceptual framework was made by the researcher. Based on deductive reasoning, the researcher created ‘broad-brush’ coding to organize the material into topics. A second and third phase of data analysis was done and nodes were created using topic coding and analytical coding. Thematic analysis was then completed.

Reliability was ensured by using the same researcher for all the interviews and focus groups. Additional, when a translator was required, the same translator was utilized, who also had an in-depth understanding of the nature of disability. Confirmability was ensured by conclusions having a strong link between supporting literature and the data gained throughout the research process.

The results indicate that persons with disabilities experience occupational marginalization, apartheid, deprivation and limited occupational choice leading to occupational injustice. This is through inaccessibility, power dynamics, lack of compassion, safety concerns and the influence of money. Unless an occupational injustice framework is applied to policy creation, many of these additional barriers will remain unresolved and not addressed. This thus highlights the importance of occupational science framework in multi-stakeholder and departmental planning. This will enable meaningful connections across disciplines and sectors and further increase the dimensionality of occupational science.