Title

Sex, cancer and quality of life: The perceived occupational possibilities of women with gynecologic cancers

Location

Charles Frost

Start Time

17-10-2014 4:54 PM

End Time

17-10-2014 5:25 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Few scholars within occupational science, therapy and oncology recognize the impact of sexual activity on the quality of life and wellbeing of individuals (Sakellariou & Algado, 2006). This is especially true for women with gynecologic cancers who undergo surgical treatments that alter their body image, change their ability to participate in meaningful occupations, and decrease their quality of life (Reis, Beji, & Coskun, 2010). In particular, there is a gap in the literature exploring how the quality of life of women with gynecologic cancers relates to their perception of social pressures for activity participation and their confidence to participate in sexual, homecare, and work occupations.

This paper will present an interdisciplinary and collaborative study of the relationship between quality of life and the perceived occupational possibilities of women with newly diagnosed gynecologic cancers. Approximately 100 women with newly diagnosed gynecologic cancers requiring surgery will complete quality of life assessments and the Possibilities for Activity Scale- Gynecologic Oncology (PAcTS-GO) at one month after their primary surgical treatment (Pergolotti & Reeve, 2014). The PAcTS-GO assesses individuals’ perception of social pressures and their confidence in doing occupations. A regression approach will assess correlates with quality of life. We hypothesize that higher quality of life scores will be associated with higher scores on the PAcTS-GO. In other words, women with better overall quality of life, following surgery, will have more confidence in activity participation and a stronger perception that sexual, work and home care occupations are socially ideal.

These findings will enhance understandings of quality of life and survivorship for women with gynecologic cancers and will elucidate the relationship between perceived social norms and quality life. Finally, this study will further understandings of occupational possibilities as related to the lived experience, and perceived possibilities of participation in occupations for women with cancer.

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Oct 17th, 4:54 PM Oct 17th, 5:25 PM

Sex, cancer and quality of life: The perceived occupational possibilities of women with gynecologic cancers

Charles Frost

Few scholars within occupational science, therapy and oncology recognize the impact of sexual activity on the quality of life and wellbeing of individuals (Sakellariou & Algado, 2006). This is especially true for women with gynecologic cancers who undergo surgical treatments that alter their body image, change their ability to participate in meaningful occupations, and decrease their quality of life (Reis, Beji, & Coskun, 2010). In particular, there is a gap in the literature exploring how the quality of life of women with gynecologic cancers relates to their perception of social pressures for activity participation and their confidence to participate in sexual, homecare, and work occupations.

This paper will present an interdisciplinary and collaborative study of the relationship between quality of life and the perceived occupational possibilities of women with newly diagnosed gynecologic cancers. Approximately 100 women with newly diagnosed gynecologic cancers requiring surgery will complete quality of life assessments and the Possibilities for Activity Scale- Gynecologic Oncology (PAcTS-GO) at one month after their primary surgical treatment (Pergolotti & Reeve, 2014). The PAcTS-GO assesses individuals’ perception of social pressures and their confidence in doing occupations. A regression approach will assess correlates with quality of life. We hypothesize that higher quality of life scores will be associated with higher scores on the PAcTS-GO. In other words, women with better overall quality of life, following surgery, will have more confidence in activity participation and a stronger perception that sexual, work and home care occupations are socially ideal.

These findings will enhance understandings of quality of life and survivorship for women with gynecologic cancers and will elucidate the relationship between perceived social norms and quality life. Finally, this study will further understandings of occupational possibilities as related to the lived experience, and perceived possibilities of participation in occupations for women with cancer.