Title

Occupation Defined: Worldviews, Philosophical Analysis & Synthesis

Presenter Information

Kathlyn L. ReedFollow

Location

Rock Island

Start Time

18-10-2014 11:40 AM

End Time

18-10-2014 12:10 PM

Session Type

Theoretical Paper

Abstract

Background & Rationale: The concept of occupation is defined in the occupational science and occupational therapy literature in many different definitions which appear to be based on different worldviews. Some definitions suggest categories of occupation (formism), others describe doing or performing occupations (organicism) and still others describe the context or environmental conditions for doing occupation (contextualism). Finally, some definitions combine two or three different worldviews.

Statement of Intent: The purpose is to use the technique of concept analyze to explore the themes within the definitions of occupation based on the worldview or worldviews attributable in the definitions, to compare the results to definitions of occupation found in dictionaries over the last three centuries and synthesize similarities and differences (Walker & Avant, 2005; Pepper, 1942).

Argument: Occupation is the central organizing concept for occupational science and occupational therapy. Many definitions exist in the literature. The focus of this presentation is to analyze the common themes in relationship to worldviews and philosophical constructs and examine the congruity to dictionary definitions.

Conclusions: Worldviews included in the definitions include formism, organicism and contextualism. Twenty-eight concepts were identified from dictionaries published from 1897 to present. OS and OT definitions of occupation contained 68 concepts. Only six concepts overlapped between the two groups of definitions

Importance to OS: Clarity of concepts is considered important in theory construction. At present the concept of occupation as stated in OS and OT literature fails to communicate a clearly articulated concept although the elements can be identified. In addition, definitions of occupation in standard English dictionaries do not convey the essence of occupation as a concept in the OS and OT literature. Professional communication is a responsibility of a discipline and should be considered in future publication.

References

Pepper, S.C. (1942). World hypoetheses. Berkley, CA: University of California Press

Walker, L.O. & Avant, K.C. (2005). Strategies for theory construction in nursing, 4th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson: Prentice Hall

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Oct 18th, 11:40 AM Oct 18th, 12:10 PM

Occupation Defined: Worldviews, Philosophical Analysis & Synthesis

Rock Island

Background & Rationale: The concept of occupation is defined in the occupational science and occupational therapy literature in many different definitions which appear to be based on different worldviews. Some definitions suggest categories of occupation (formism), others describe doing or performing occupations (organicism) and still others describe the context or environmental conditions for doing occupation (contextualism). Finally, some definitions combine two or three different worldviews.

Statement of Intent: The purpose is to use the technique of concept analyze to explore the themes within the definitions of occupation based on the worldview or worldviews attributable in the definitions, to compare the results to definitions of occupation found in dictionaries over the last three centuries and synthesize similarities and differences (Walker & Avant, 2005; Pepper, 1942).

Argument: Occupation is the central organizing concept for occupational science and occupational therapy. Many definitions exist in the literature. The focus of this presentation is to analyze the common themes in relationship to worldviews and philosophical constructs and examine the congruity to dictionary definitions.

Conclusions: Worldviews included in the definitions include formism, organicism and contextualism. Twenty-eight concepts were identified from dictionaries published from 1897 to present. OS and OT definitions of occupation contained 68 concepts. Only six concepts overlapped between the two groups of definitions

Importance to OS: Clarity of concepts is considered important in theory construction. At present the concept of occupation as stated in OS and OT literature fails to communicate a clearly articulated concept although the elements can be identified. In addition, definitions of occupation in standard English dictionaries do not convey the essence of occupation as a concept in the OS and OT literature. Professional communication is a responsibility of a discipline and should be considered in future publication.