Title

Digital access and occupational justice among young people with disabilities

Location

Hiawatha 3

Start Time

18-10-2014 2:20 PM

End Time

18-10-2014 2:50 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

From an occupational justice perspective this paper reports on young Swedish people’s (9-16 years) engagement in computer activities in school and during leisure time focusing on children and young people with disabilities in comparison with general population. Article 9 (on accessibility) in the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities states that the parties to the convention shall take appropriate measures to ‘promote access for persons with disabilities to new information and communications technologies and systems, including the Internet’. The United Nations’ position is that digital access is a matter involving equality between groups of people, the securing of democratic rights, and equal opportunities for all citizens.

Analysis is based on survey data where computer and internet use by young people with disabilities (n= 389) are compared with a reference group from general population (n=940). The results demonstrate that young people with disabilities had restricted participation in computer use in educational activities, in comparison to young people in general. During leisure time however, the opposite pattern were found. Out of school young people with disabilities had a leading position with respect to internet use in a variety of activities. The discussion points to beneficial environmental conditions at home (and the reverse in school) as parts of the explanation for the differing engagement levels at home and at school, and among young people with disabilities and young people in general.

internet activities, adolescence, equality

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Oct 18th, 2:20 PM Oct 18th, 2:50 PM

Digital access and occupational justice among young people with disabilities

Hiawatha 3

From an occupational justice perspective this paper reports on young Swedish people’s (9-16 years) engagement in computer activities in school and during leisure time focusing on children and young people with disabilities in comparison with general population. Article 9 (on accessibility) in the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities states that the parties to the convention shall take appropriate measures to ‘promote access for persons with disabilities to new information and communications technologies and systems, including the Internet’. The United Nations’ position is that digital access is a matter involving equality between groups of people, the securing of democratic rights, and equal opportunities for all citizens.

Analysis is based on survey data where computer and internet use by young people with disabilities (n= 389) are compared with a reference group from general population (n=940). The results demonstrate that young people with disabilities had restricted participation in computer use in educational activities, in comparison to young people in general. During leisure time however, the opposite pattern were found. Out of school young people with disabilities had a leading position with respect to internet use in a variety of activities. The discussion points to beneficial environmental conditions at home (and the reverse in school) as parts of the explanation for the differing engagement levels at home and at school, and among young people with disabilities and young people in general.

internet activities, adolescence, equality