Title

Poster Session - The occupational benefits associated with persons caring for a pet

Location

New River Rooms A & B

Start Time

2-10-2015 8:00 PM

End Time

2-10-2015 9:00 PM

Abstract

Choosing to own a dog often requires a higher commitment level to each of the areas provided in order to take care of the pet. Feeding requires careful consideration of the food that would be the best for the dog. There has been an increased interest in feeding dogs a raw, natural diet to ensure the ingredients are known (Billinghurst, 2001). Feeding a raw, natural diet also eliminates many ingredients and additives that pets are allergic to in commercial pet food. Grooming consists of caring for their coat, teeth, and nails by the individual or outside service provider. Illness and prevention has become increasingly expensive with the first year costing $300 to $1,300 for the year and a minimum of $300 each year following in veterinarian health and wellness visits alone without including the cost of unknown emergency veterinary care (Petfinder, n.d.). An alternative option for individuals on a fixed household income is to obtain health insurance for the pet. Coverage plans are similar to humans in that they differ greatly in the services provided, so ample research is suggested. Research has been completed to study the effects in each aspect of a person’s life in regards to owning a pet. Pet ownership is intricately connected to a person’s occupational health through meaning linked to place spirituality and time, improving occupational balance, engagement, identity, and well-being.

The act of owning a pet can directly and indirectly affect a person in many ways. Having a pet in a home creates a special meaning of the place the person lives. The care a pet needs creates a sense of purpose for the person, which has an effect on the person’s spirituality. Routines and habits involved with feeding, toileting, training, and sleep schedules impact the temporal aspects of time in a person’s life. Physical activity, play, and training required for pets ensure and help the person to create occupational balance within his or her life. Owning a pet also creates unique areas of occupational engagement within the community through animal groups and associations. The physical activity required for an animal has influenced a person’s physical health in taking a pet for walks or playing within the home environment. The human-animal bond created between the person and pet decreases anxiety, depression, and strengthens the mental health of the person who owns a pet.

Keywords: pet, occupation, health benefits

References

Brough, P., Holt, J., Bauld, R., Biggs, A., & Ryan, C. (2008). The ability of work-life balance policies to influence key social/organisational issues. Asian-Pacific Journal of Human Resources, 46, 261-274

Dembicki, D., & Anderson, J. (1996). Pet ownership may be a factor in improved heath of the elderly. Journal of Nutrition for the Elderly, 15(3), 15-31

Friedmann, E., Thomas, S. (1995). Pet ownership, social support, and one-year survival after acute myocardial infarction in the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial (CAST). The American Journal of Cardiology, 76(17), 1213-1217.

Knight, S., & Edwards, V. (2008). In the company of wolves: the physical, social, and psychological benefits of dog ownership. Journal of Aging and Health, 20(4), 437-455.

Zimolag, U. (2011). An evolutionary concept analysis of caring for a pet as an everyday occupation. Journal of Occupational Science, 18(3), 237-253. doi:10.1080/14427591.2011.586325

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Oct 2nd, 8:00 PM Oct 2nd, 9:00 PM

Poster Session - The occupational benefits associated with persons caring for a pet

New River Rooms A & B

Choosing to own a dog often requires a higher commitment level to each of the areas provided in order to take care of the pet. Feeding requires careful consideration of the food that would be the best for the dog. There has been an increased interest in feeding dogs a raw, natural diet to ensure the ingredients are known (Billinghurst, 2001). Feeding a raw, natural diet also eliminates many ingredients and additives that pets are allergic to in commercial pet food. Grooming consists of caring for their coat, teeth, and nails by the individual or outside service provider. Illness and prevention has become increasingly expensive with the first year costing $300 to $1,300 for the year and a minimum of $300 each year following in veterinarian health and wellness visits alone without including the cost of unknown emergency veterinary care (Petfinder, n.d.). An alternative option for individuals on a fixed household income is to obtain health insurance for the pet. Coverage plans are similar to humans in that they differ greatly in the services provided, so ample research is suggested. Research has been completed to study the effects in each aspect of a person’s life in regards to owning a pet. Pet ownership is intricately connected to a person’s occupational health through meaning linked to place spirituality and time, improving occupational balance, engagement, identity, and well-being.

The act of owning a pet can directly and indirectly affect a person in many ways. Having a pet in a home creates a special meaning of the place the person lives. The care a pet needs creates a sense of purpose for the person, which has an effect on the person’s spirituality. Routines and habits involved with feeding, toileting, training, and sleep schedules impact the temporal aspects of time in a person’s life. Physical activity, play, and training required for pets ensure and help the person to create occupational balance within his or her life. Owning a pet also creates unique areas of occupational engagement within the community through animal groups and associations. The physical activity required for an animal has influenced a person’s physical health in taking a pet for walks or playing within the home environment. The human-animal bond created between the person and pet decreases anxiety, depression, and strengthens the mental health of the person who owns a pet.

Keywords: pet, occupation, health benefits