Title

Gamification of cognitive assessment: Emerging transdisciplinary technology

Location

New River Room B

Start Time

2-10-2015 9:00 AM

End Time

2-10-2015 11:00 AM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE:

The purpose of this paper is to:

  • Describe the transdisciplinary development process of video games to engage users in authentic occupation during the assessment of cognitive skills
  • Demonstrate preliminary validity of videogames as cognitive assessment by presenting the results of two pilot studies of concurrent validity

DESCRIPTION OF METHODS:

  • Participants were OIF/OEF era veterans reporting chronic post-concussion symptoms who currently reside in community living settings in a large west coast city.
  • Data captured by software were collected in the community in real time on touch screen devices running Windows or Android operating systems. Data captured on test forms and paper questionnaires were entered into digital spreadsheets by hand.
  • Analyses were performed using SPSS for Windows V20. Analyses for concurrent validity were correlational.

REPORT OF RESULTS

  • Concurrent validity data of ingame assessments and a suite of “stand alone” gamified assessments will be reported, long with software usability survey data. Overall, moderate to strong correlations were found between selected gold standard paper assessments used by clinicians and the gamified assessments.
  • Users reported anecdotal evidence of reduced stigma associated with testing using gamified assessments.
  • In addition, users reported greater motivation and a more positive user experience with the gamified assessments over the gold standard assessments.

DISCUSSION/IMPLICATIONS AS RELATED TO OCCUPATIONAL SCIENCE

  • Transdisciplinary principles including those of occupational science drove the development of an authentic occupational experience in video games for assessing cognitive skills. These principles included: (1) user centered design (DIS, 2010) / person centered experience as a lens of inquiry; (2) software user experience (Albert & Tullis, 2013) drives utilization/purposeful and meaningful experience yields optimal engagement in occupation (Hocking, 2001); (3) dynamic difficulty adjustment (Afergan et al., 2014) / just right challenge / flow as interrelated transdisciplinary constructs; (4) occupation as transaction (Dickie & Cutchin, 2013) at the human-computer interface; (5) ecological validity in assessment.
  • The rich heritage of occupational science arose from both a century of practice of occupational therapy and the more recent systematic inquiry of scholars. These sources of knowledge provided the infrastructure for cognitive assessment contextualized in the form of videogames.
  • Each year technology surveys report larger proportions of the population using computer software more of the time for a greater variety of activities. The theoretical infrastructure and transdisciplinary nature of occupational science is well positioned to translate science into quality user experience.

KEY WORDS: cognition, assessment, video games

References

Afergan, D., Peck, E. M., Solovey, E. T., Jenkins, A., Hincks, S. W., Brown, E. T., . . . Jacob, R. J. (2014). Dynamic difficulty using brain metrics of workload. Paper presented at the Proceedings of the 32nd annual ACM conference on Human factors in computing systems.

Albert, W., & Tullis, T. (2013). Measuring the user experience: collecting, analyzing, and presenting usability metrics: Newnes.

Dickie, V. A., & Cutchin, M. P. (2013). Transactional Perspectives on Occupation: Main Points of Contribution in This Volume Transactional Perspectives on Occupation (pp. 257-261): Springer.

DIS, I. (2010). 9241-210: 2010 Ergonomics of human system interaction-Part 210: Human-centred design for interactive systems

Hocking, C. (2001). Implementing occupation-based assessment. The American journal of occupational therapy: official publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association, 55(4), 463.

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Oct 2nd, 9:00 AM Oct 2nd, 11:00 AM

Gamification of cognitive assessment: Emerging transdisciplinary technology

New River Room B

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE:

The purpose of this paper is to:

  • Describe the transdisciplinary development process of video games to engage users in authentic occupation during the assessment of cognitive skills
  • Demonstrate preliminary validity of videogames as cognitive assessment by presenting the results of two pilot studies of concurrent validity

DESCRIPTION OF METHODS:

  • Participants were OIF/OEF era veterans reporting chronic post-concussion symptoms who currently reside in community living settings in a large west coast city.
  • Data captured by software were collected in the community in real time on touch screen devices running Windows or Android operating systems. Data captured on test forms and paper questionnaires were entered into digital spreadsheets by hand.
  • Analyses were performed using SPSS for Windows V20. Analyses for concurrent validity were correlational.

REPORT OF RESULTS

  • Concurrent validity data of ingame assessments and a suite of “stand alone” gamified assessments will be reported, long with software usability survey data. Overall, moderate to strong correlations were found between selected gold standard paper assessments used by clinicians and the gamified assessments.
  • Users reported anecdotal evidence of reduced stigma associated with testing using gamified assessments.
  • In addition, users reported greater motivation and a more positive user experience with the gamified assessments over the gold standard assessments.

DISCUSSION/IMPLICATIONS AS RELATED TO OCCUPATIONAL SCIENCE

  • Transdisciplinary principles including those of occupational science drove the development of an authentic occupational experience in video games for assessing cognitive skills. These principles included: (1) user centered design (DIS, 2010) / person centered experience as a lens of inquiry; (2) software user experience (Albert & Tullis, 2013) drives utilization/purposeful and meaningful experience yields optimal engagement in occupation (Hocking, 2001); (3) dynamic difficulty adjustment (Afergan et al., 2014) / just right challenge / flow as interrelated transdisciplinary constructs; (4) occupation as transaction (Dickie & Cutchin, 2013) at the human-computer interface; (5) ecological validity in assessment.
  • The rich heritage of occupational science arose from both a century of practice of occupational therapy and the more recent systematic inquiry of scholars. These sources of knowledge provided the infrastructure for cognitive assessment contextualized in the form of videogames.
  • Each year technology surveys report larger proportions of the population using computer software more of the time for a greater variety of activities. The theoretical infrastructure and transdisciplinary nature of occupational science is well positioned to translate science into quality user experience.

KEY WORDS: cognition, assessment, video games