Title

Morning routines of persons with chronic disabilities: Use of participant-generated photography for data collection

Location

New River Room B

Start Time

2-10-2015 3:00 PM

End Time

2-10-2015 4:30 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to examine morning routines of individual’s with chronic disabilities using participant-generated photography to guide semi-structured interviews for a qualitative study. The research was conducted over a two-year period. Year One: four adults with chronic disabilities were recruited by student researchers. Participants ranged in age from 50 to 73 years old and living with disability for six to 20 years. Interviews were transcribed and reviewed line-by-line to highlight important, key statements and included reflective remarks (or jottings) in the margins. Individual analysis of each interview was completed for initial coding followed by cross-case analysis for purposes of final coding. Codes were labeled using terminology from the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework. The following characteristics of morning routines were identified: Activities of Daily Living (ADL), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), Objects (medical and typical), Context: Temporal, Context: Other than Temporal, and Values. Photographs were reviewed for confirmation of characteristics. Year Two: seven additional adults with chronic disabilities were recruited by a new group of student researchers. Participants ranged in age from 21 to 87 years old and living with disability for three to 34 years. Interviews were transcribed and reviewed for the previously identified characteristics (from Year One) and any additional themes were examined using cross-case analysis. Themes that emerged included: Importance of self-developed routines, Importance of object placement, Impact of chronic pain and fatigue, and Motivation to live a typical life. All analysis and results were completed under the supervision of an experienced researcher. Results were then compared to a previous study of the morning routines of typical individuals for similarities and differences. Overall, individuals with chronic disabilities reported using more objects (medical) and needing an apparently longer period of time to complete their morning routines. A clear end to the morning routine was problematic for those with chronic disabilities who were not going to a job. Many similarities also were found between typical individuals and those with chronic disabilities. Challenges of comparison related to different data collection choices will be discussed. Advantages of using participant-generated photography as a data collection method for occupational science research include improved connectedness between researcher and participant, usability with participants who are non-verbal or have a language challenge, triangulation of data collected, and current ease of accessing digital media.

Key Words: Morning routines, Chronic Disabilities, Photography

Objectives for discussion period

1. Next directions for researching morning routines

2. Thoughts about chronic disability and aging

3. Management of photographic and other visual methods of data collection

4. What other occupations might be studied using participant-generated photography

References

American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) (2014). Occupational therapy practice framework: Domain and process. 3rd Ed. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68: S1-S48.

Guillemin, M. & Drew, S. (2010). Questions of process in participant-generated visual methodologies. Visual Studies, 25: 175-188

Miles, M.B., Huberman, A.M. & Saldana, J. (2013). Qualitative data analysis: A Methods Sourcebook. (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, Inc.

Reich, J. & Williams, J .(2003). Exploring the properties of habits and routines in daily life. OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 23(2): 48-56.

Royeen, C. B. (2010). Towards an emerging understanding of morning routines: A preliminary study using developing methods in art-based inquiry. The Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, 38(1): 30-42.

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Oct 2nd, 3:00 PM Oct 2nd, 4:30 PM

Morning routines of persons with chronic disabilities: Use of participant-generated photography for data collection

New River Room B

The purpose of this research was to examine morning routines of individual’s with chronic disabilities using participant-generated photography to guide semi-structured interviews for a qualitative study. The research was conducted over a two-year period. Year One: four adults with chronic disabilities were recruited by student researchers. Participants ranged in age from 50 to 73 years old and living with disability for six to 20 years. Interviews were transcribed and reviewed line-by-line to highlight important, key statements and included reflective remarks (or jottings) in the margins. Individual analysis of each interview was completed for initial coding followed by cross-case analysis for purposes of final coding. Codes were labeled using terminology from the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework. The following characteristics of morning routines were identified: Activities of Daily Living (ADL), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), Objects (medical and typical), Context: Temporal, Context: Other than Temporal, and Values. Photographs were reviewed for confirmation of characteristics. Year Two: seven additional adults with chronic disabilities were recruited by a new group of student researchers. Participants ranged in age from 21 to 87 years old and living with disability for three to 34 years. Interviews were transcribed and reviewed for the previously identified characteristics (from Year One) and any additional themes were examined using cross-case analysis. Themes that emerged included: Importance of self-developed routines, Importance of object placement, Impact of chronic pain and fatigue, and Motivation to live a typical life. All analysis and results were completed under the supervision of an experienced researcher. Results were then compared to a previous study of the morning routines of typical individuals for similarities and differences. Overall, individuals with chronic disabilities reported using more objects (medical) and needing an apparently longer period of time to complete their morning routines. A clear end to the morning routine was problematic for those with chronic disabilities who were not going to a job. Many similarities also were found between typical individuals and those with chronic disabilities. Challenges of comparison related to different data collection choices will be discussed. Advantages of using participant-generated photography as a data collection method for occupational science research include improved connectedness between researcher and participant, usability with participants who are non-verbal or have a language challenge, triangulation of data collected, and current ease of accessing digital media.

Key Words: Morning routines, Chronic Disabilities, Photography

Objectives for discussion period

1. Next directions for researching morning routines

2. Thoughts about chronic disability and aging

3. Management of photographic and other visual methods of data collection

4. What other occupations might be studied using participant-generated photography