Title

Picture this: Exploring the lived experience of high-functioning stroke survivors via photovoice

Location

New River Room B

Start Time

2-10-2015 9:00 AM

End Time

2-10-2015 11:00 AM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Introduction. Community participation is a critical component of occupational engagement and quality of life (QOL) following stroke. An increasing number of stroke survivors are presenting with minimal functional impairments. These high-functioning stroke survivors are often discharged with minimum community supports and services for engagement in occupations. However, despite their high level of function, they may have “nonvisible” or overlooked impacts from stroke that may hinder their community participation. Hence, it is essential to learn from stroke survivors about their experiences and perspectives on limitations in community participation. Objectives. To explore the lived experience of high-functioning stroke survivors and to identify potential gaps in community services. Methods. Photovoice, a community-based participatory research method, was used with 5 high-functioning stroke survivors who photo-documented their personal experiences related to recovery and daily occupations following stroke. Stories and meanings behind the photographs were elicited through 5 focus group sessions, which were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and inductively analyzed to identify themes. Participants hosted 2 community photo exhibitions to educate the public and stimulate change. Results. Five themes emerged from our analysis: importance of appropriate and accessible services, financial determinants of QOL, lack of understanding and consideration for persons with disability, self-reliance and dependence on others, and emotional and behavioural impacts after stroke. The community photo exhibitions attracted stakeholders and provided insight into a need for change. Conclusion. Photovoice is a client-centred approach that has strengthened our understanding of the occupational needs of high-functioning stroke survivors through the use of participant-generated data. This may ultimately contribute to the understanding of the barriers and facilitators for engaging in daily occupations of stroke survivors, and the development of meaningful community programs and services that can increase participation and QOL for stroke survivors.

Key words: stroke, participation, community

References

O’Connell, B., Hanna, B., Penney, W., Pearce, J., Owen, M., & Warelow, P. (2001). Recovery after stroke: a qualitative perspective. Journal of Quality in Clinical Practice, 21(4), 120-125.

Pound, P., Gompertz, P., & Ebrahim, S. (1998). A patient-centered study of the consequences of stroke. Clinical Rehabilitation, 12(3), 255-264.

Reed, M., Harrington, R., Duggan, A., & Wood, V. A. (2009). Meeting stroke survivors’ perceived needs: A qualitative study of a community-based exercise and education scheme. Clinical Rehabilitation, 1-10.

Mumma, C. M. (2000). Perceived losses following stroke. Rehabilitation Nursing, 25(5), 192-195.

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Oct 2nd, 9:00 AM Oct 2nd, 11:00 AM

Picture this: Exploring the lived experience of high-functioning stroke survivors via photovoice

New River Room B

Introduction. Community participation is a critical component of occupational engagement and quality of life (QOL) following stroke. An increasing number of stroke survivors are presenting with minimal functional impairments. These high-functioning stroke survivors are often discharged with minimum community supports and services for engagement in occupations. However, despite their high level of function, they may have “nonvisible” or overlooked impacts from stroke that may hinder their community participation. Hence, it is essential to learn from stroke survivors about their experiences and perspectives on limitations in community participation. Objectives. To explore the lived experience of high-functioning stroke survivors and to identify potential gaps in community services. Methods. Photovoice, a community-based participatory research method, was used with 5 high-functioning stroke survivors who photo-documented their personal experiences related to recovery and daily occupations following stroke. Stories and meanings behind the photographs were elicited through 5 focus group sessions, which were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and inductively analyzed to identify themes. Participants hosted 2 community photo exhibitions to educate the public and stimulate change. Results. Five themes emerged from our analysis: importance of appropriate and accessible services, financial determinants of QOL, lack of understanding and consideration for persons with disability, self-reliance and dependence on others, and emotional and behavioural impacts after stroke. The community photo exhibitions attracted stakeholders and provided insight into a need for change. Conclusion. Photovoice is a client-centred approach that has strengthened our understanding of the occupational needs of high-functioning stroke survivors through the use of participant-generated data. This may ultimately contribute to the understanding of the barriers and facilitators for engaging in daily occupations of stroke survivors, and the development of meaningful community programs and services that can increase participation and QOL for stroke survivors.

Key words: stroke, participation, community