Title

Poster Session - Translating occupational science knowledge about immigration using a framework of occupational justice

Location

New River Rooms A & B

Start Time

2-10-2015 8:00 PM

End Time

2-10-2015 9:00 PM

Abstract

The phenomenon of immigration has been studied exhaustively by political and social scientists, their foci ranging from productivity to cultural trends. Occupational science adds to the aforementioned research by acknowledging the complexity of immigration and emphasizing how occupations affect and are affected by international relocation (Huot, Laliberte Rudman, Dodson, & Magalhaes, 2013). The purpose of this literature review was to explore the occupational perspective of immigration and identify gaps that still exist in current knowledge. Twenty-four articles published between 2007 and 2013 in six journals contributed to this literature review.

According to existing literature, many immigrants experience occupational injustices in their new environments. Although one reason for immigration is the promise of a more prosperous career and greater opportunity for work occupations, one common outcome is demotion in salary or type of employment. This can cause feelings of stress, injustice, and dissatisfaction for immigrants (Heigl, Kinebanian, & Josephsson, 2011). Research suggests that, for reasons including racial stigmatization or differences in system structures, knowledge and skills do not always transfer equally across cultures (Hocking, 2012). As a result, immigrants may lack opportunities to participate in necessary and meaningful occupations, work or otherwise (Sterling & Nayar, 2013). These findings suggest that immigrants may benefit from finding ways to develop and translate their skills into new occupations after moving to new contexts. Occupational scientists can facilitate this development by interpreting and communicating this knowledge to immigrants as well as other disciplines and professions that work with immigrants.

The results of this literature review suggest that occupational scientists can utilize an occupational justice approach to enable knowledge translation and justice within the immigrant population; accordingly, this poster outlines ways in which enablement skills from the Participatory Occupational Justice Framework (Whiteford & Townsend, 2011) can be used to facilitate translation of occupational science knowledge into collaborations with immigrant communities. Using this framework may guide agencies and service providers to better help immigrants communicate their proficiencies and strategize ways to utilize skills in their new contexts. Facilitating knowledge translation in this way may eventually ease immigrants’ transitions and open up opportunities for their participation in important and meaningful occupations.

Keywords: immigration, occupations, occupational injustice

References

Heigl, F., Kinebanian, A., & Josephsson, S. (2011). I think of my family, therefore I am: Perceptions of daily occupations of some Albanians in Switzerland. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 18, 36-48. doi:10.3109/11038120903552648

Hocking, C. (2012). Working for citizenship: The dangers of occupational deprivation. Work, 41, 391-395. doi:10.3233/WOR-2012-1316

Huot, S., Laliberte Rudman, D., Dodson, B., and Magalhaes, L. (2013). Expanding policy-based conceptualizations of ‘successful integration’: Negotiating integration through occupation following international migration. Journal of Occupational Science, 20(1), 6-22. doi:10.1080/14427591.2012.717497

Sterling, K., & Nayar, S. (2013). Changes to occupation for Indian immigrant men: Questions for practice. New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62(2), 21-26.

Whiteford, G., & Townsend, E. (2011). Participatory occupational justice framework (POJF 2010): Enabling occupational participation and inclusion. In F. Kronenberg, & N. Pollard, & D. Sakellariou (Eds.). Occupational Therapy Without Borders: Towards an Ecology of Education Based Practices (Vol. 2, pp. 65-84). New York: Elsevier.

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Oct 2nd, 8:00 PM Oct 2nd, 9:00 PM

Poster Session - Translating occupational science knowledge about immigration using a framework of occupational justice

New River Rooms A & B

The phenomenon of immigration has been studied exhaustively by political and social scientists, their foci ranging from productivity to cultural trends. Occupational science adds to the aforementioned research by acknowledging the complexity of immigration and emphasizing how occupations affect and are affected by international relocation (Huot, Laliberte Rudman, Dodson, & Magalhaes, 2013). The purpose of this literature review was to explore the occupational perspective of immigration and identify gaps that still exist in current knowledge. Twenty-four articles published between 2007 and 2013 in six journals contributed to this literature review.

According to existing literature, many immigrants experience occupational injustices in their new environments. Although one reason for immigration is the promise of a more prosperous career and greater opportunity for work occupations, one common outcome is demotion in salary or type of employment. This can cause feelings of stress, injustice, and dissatisfaction for immigrants (Heigl, Kinebanian, & Josephsson, 2011). Research suggests that, for reasons including racial stigmatization or differences in system structures, knowledge and skills do not always transfer equally across cultures (Hocking, 2012). As a result, immigrants may lack opportunities to participate in necessary and meaningful occupations, work or otherwise (Sterling & Nayar, 2013). These findings suggest that immigrants may benefit from finding ways to develop and translate their skills into new occupations after moving to new contexts. Occupational scientists can facilitate this development by interpreting and communicating this knowledge to immigrants as well as other disciplines and professions that work with immigrants.

The results of this literature review suggest that occupational scientists can utilize an occupational justice approach to enable knowledge translation and justice within the immigrant population; accordingly, this poster outlines ways in which enablement skills from the Participatory Occupational Justice Framework (Whiteford & Townsend, 2011) can be used to facilitate translation of occupational science knowledge into collaborations with immigrant communities. Using this framework may guide agencies and service providers to better help immigrants communicate their proficiencies and strategize ways to utilize skills in their new contexts. Facilitating knowledge translation in this way may eventually ease immigrants’ transitions and open up opportunities for their participation in important and meaningful occupations.

Keywords: immigration, occupations, occupational injustice