Title

Poster Session - Health status after job loss—Does the reason for job change matter?

Location

New River Rooms A & B

Start Time

2-10-2015 8:00 PM

End Time

2-10-2015 9:00 PM

Abstract

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE: Examine health status of the recently but no longer employed population by reason for job loss or leaving.

DESCRIPTION OF METHODS: Using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2008-2012, a sample of 8742 respondents experiencing job loss during the survey year were evaluated by reason. We compared those who passively lose employment with a group naming a reason and purpose for leaving work, examining how the reasons and conditions following employment relate to health outcomes. Multivariate regressions and ordered probit models were used to estimate the association between unemployment reasons and SF-12v2 physical (PCS), mental (MCS), and self-rated health outcomes post-unemployment, controlling for demographic, socioeconomic, and prior health factors.

RESULTS: Health status was significantly worse among those who passively lost employment from layoffs or jobs ending, compared to health status of the recently employed population who left jobs for maternity, family care, or pursuing education. The negative associations between jobs lost and health outcomes were more substantial among respondents with better prior health status.

DISCUSSION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR OCCUPATIONAL SCIENCE: Unemployment has received the bulk of attention in study of health effects related to employment change, though job instability was identified as a related stressor in early meta-analytic reviews on the associations between unemployment and health (Dooley, Fielding, & Levi, Health and unemployment., 1996). Since that time precarious employment has been linked to job stress and health declines (Burgard, Brand, & House, 2009) (Benach, 2014) and there has been attention to expanding the study further to discouraged workers, those who have given up looking for work because they feel there are no jobs available to them (Aldrich, 2011). These groups share a recent but tenuous attachment to the labor market which has provided both economic and non-economic benefits. Our study likewise examines an extended pool of those marginally attached to the labor market in looking at the recently but no longer employed. As secondary analysis, we did not measure time-use following unemployment directly, but findings from our study corroborate prior findings that effective time use correlates with improved coping and better psychological health during unemployment (Van Hoye & Lootens, 2013). A study of time use during the 2008 recession found that only 2-6% of time in lost work hours was applied to productive activity (Aguiar, Hurst, & Karabarbounis, 2013). We hypothesized that job leavers who engage in named unpaid occupations that provide time structure, purpose, and regular activity would have better health outcomes than job leavers without named replacement activities. Our findings support this conclusion and have implications for including time-use and activity structure within the policy and programming offered to the unemployed and to job leavers.

References

Aguiar, M., Hurst, E., & Karabarbounis, L. (2013). Time use during the great recession. The American Economic Review, 103(5), 1664-1696.

Aldrich, R. M. (2011). Discouraged Workers' Daily Occupations: Exploring Complex Transactions in the Experience of Unemployment. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Department of Allied Health Sciences.

Dooley, D., Fielding, J., & Levi, L. (1996). Health and unemployment. Annual Review of Public Health, 17, 449-465.

Jahoda, M. (1982). Employment and Unemployment, a social psychological analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Van Hoye, G., & Lootens, H. (2013). Coping with unemployment: Personality, role demands, and time structure. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 82(2), 85-95.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 2nd, 8:00 PM Oct 2nd, 9:00 PM

Poster Session - Health status after job loss—Does the reason for job change matter?

New River Rooms A & B

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE: Examine health status of the recently but no longer employed population by reason for job loss or leaving.

DESCRIPTION OF METHODS: Using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2008-2012, a sample of 8742 respondents experiencing job loss during the survey year were evaluated by reason. We compared those who passively lose employment with a group naming a reason and purpose for leaving work, examining how the reasons and conditions following employment relate to health outcomes. Multivariate regressions and ordered probit models were used to estimate the association between unemployment reasons and SF-12v2 physical (PCS), mental (MCS), and self-rated health outcomes post-unemployment, controlling for demographic, socioeconomic, and prior health factors.

RESULTS: Health status was significantly worse among those who passively lost employment from layoffs or jobs ending, compared to health status of the recently employed population who left jobs for maternity, family care, or pursuing education. The negative associations between jobs lost and health outcomes were more substantial among respondents with better prior health status.

DISCUSSION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR OCCUPATIONAL SCIENCE: Unemployment has received the bulk of attention in study of health effects related to employment change, though job instability was identified as a related stressor in early meta-analytic reviews on the associations between unemployment and health (Dooley, Fielding, & Levi, Health and unemployment., 1996). Since that time precarious employment has been linked to job stress and health declines (Burgard, Brand, & House, 2009) (Benach, 2014) and there has been attention to expanding the study further to discouraged workers, those who have given up looking for work because they feel there are no jobs available to them (Aldrich, 2011). These groups share a recent but tenuous attachment to the labor market which has provided both economic and non-economic benefits. Our study likewise examines an extended pool of those marginally attached to the labor market in looking at the recently but no longer employed. As secondary analysis, we did not measure time-use following unemployment directly, but findings from our study corroborate prior findings that effective time use correlates with improved coping and better psychological health during unemployment (Van Hoye & Lootens, 2013). A study of time use during the 2008 recession found that only 2-6% of time in lost work hours was applied to productive activity (Aguiar, Hurst, & Karabarbounis, 2013). We hypothesized that job leavers who engage in named unpaid occupations that provide time structure, purpose, and regular activity would have better health outcomes than job leavers without named replacement activities. Our findings support this conclusion and have implications for including time-use and activity structure within the policy and programming offered to the unemployed and to job leavers.