Title

Renaissance of adolescence in the third stage of life

Location

New River Room B

Start Time

2-10-2015 3:00 PM

End Time

2-10-2015 4:30 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Name: Charlotte Brasic Royeen, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Affiliation: Rush University

Location: Chicago, Illinois

Email: croyeen@gmail.com

Key words: occupational patterns/paradigmatic shifts/occupational identity

Author’s objectives for the discussion period

1. Compare temporal patterns of occupation over time.

2. Analyze a conceptual model for paradigmatic shifts in occupation that integrates existing literature in occupational science as relevant to the case study.

3. Discuss the benefits and areas of challenge when doing case study research.

4. Analyze how descriptive research fits into the stages of research pertaining to a body of knowledge.

Type of paper: Descriptive Research

Targeted Conference Theme: Methodologies to Advance the Study of Occupation

Relevant subthemes: Occupational Patterns & Methodology to Advance the Study of Occupation

Title: Renaissance of Adolescence in the Third Stage of Life: A Self-Referenced Case Study of Paradigmatic Shifts in an Adult’s Occupational Patterns

Statement of Purpose: Changes or shifts in patterns of human occupation are poorly understood. In 1994 Royeen presented one of the earliest explorations of paradigmatic shifts in human occupation. Subsequently, others have explored a range of issues regarding patterns of occupations across the lifespan including Eakman and Edlund (2012).The purpose of this paper is to revisit Royeen’s (1994) work and to integrate critical concepts in occupational science literature to an updated conceptual model.

Description of Methods: In this qualitative research presentation, a descriptive self-referenced case study will be delineated as what Merriam called a legitimate research design (1988). Further, this illustrative, self-referenced case study is both a process and product connecting personal experiences to a larger understanding. Data collected and used in the case study are documents, reflective journal writing, and repeated analysis using the COPM, e-mail conversations with a key colleague, and artifacts from travel, art and other forms of doing. The case study design and timeline (6 months) will be presented including (a) what data was collected, (b) how data was collected, (c) critical temporal events, (d) methods of reflexive analysis of the data, and (e) criteria for data interpretation including issues of trustworthiness of the data.

Report of Results: Emerging themes of the descriptive, self-referenced case study will be discussed and critiqued as follows. First, the theme of occupational integrity and occupational identify across changes in life patterns will be discussed (Bair, 2008). Second, the match of typical developmental issues of adolescence (Beckett & Taylor, 2010) with the issues of major shifts in occupational patterns as an adult will be identified and explored. Third, the theme of well-being as a renaissance and as a goal of the synthesis of occupational patterns and literature will be discussed. Fourth, a working timeline of a triad of deliberative stages of occupational sub patterns will be discussed including (1) anticipatory occupations (2) transitioning occupations, and (3) restorative occupations via searching and seeking occupational value and categorization by main, hidden or unexpected occupations will be presented and analyzed.

Discussion/implications as related to occupational science: How the results of this paper are related to and integrated with occupational science literature will be delineated. Finally, the process of descriptive case study research in this instance and as an overall methodology to advance the study of occupational science will presented and promoted. The strengths and limitations of this particular case study as well as the strengths and limitations of case study research as a tool for the investigating occupational science occupation will be posited.

Importance to Occupational Science: Certainly case study research has been critical in the development of major theorists such as Freud and Piaget: Occupational science has not fully explored its possibilities for developing knowledge and understanding in occupational science. Theoretical development as can be provided by case study research will be presented to add conceptualization and theory to understanding of patterns of occupation and key related concepts within the scope of occupational science.

References

Bair, S.E. (2008). The centrality of occupation during life transitions. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 63(5), 231-237.

Beckett, C., & Taylor, H. (2010). Who am I going to be? Adolescence, identity and change. In C. Beckett, & CH. Taylor, (Eds.) Human Growth and Development (pp. 92-108). Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

Eakman, A.M. & Edlund, M. (2012). The relative impact of personality traits, meaningful occupation and occupational value on meaning in life and life satisfaction. Journal of Occupational Science, 19(2), 165-177. doi :10.1080/14427591.2012/671762.

Merriam, S.B. (1988). Case study research in education: A qualitative approach. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Royeen, C.B. (1994). Paradigmatic shifts in human occupation. In C. Royeen (Ed.) Putting occupation back into therapy. Bethesda, MD: American Occupational Therapy Association.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 2nd, 3:00 PM Oct 2nd, 4:30 PM

Renaissance of adolescence in the third stage of life

New River Room B

Name: Charlotte Brasic Royeen, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Affiliation: Rush University

Location: Chicago, Illinois

Email: croyeen@gmail.com

Key words: occupational patterns/paradigmatic shifts/occupational identity

Author’s objectives for the discussion period

1. Compare temporal patterns of occupation over time.

2. Analyze a conceptual model for paradigmatic shifts in occupation that integrates existing literature in occupational science as relevant to the case study.

3. Discuss the benefits and areas of challenge when doing case study research.

4. Analyze how descriptive research fits into the stages of research pertaining to a body of knowledge.

Type of paper: Descriptive Research

Targeted Conference Theme: Methodologies to Advance the Study of Occupation

Relevant subthemes: Occupational Patterns & Methodology to Advance the Study of Occupation

Title: Renaissance of Adolescence in the Third Stage of Life: A Self-Referenced Case Study of Paradigmatic Shifts in an Adult’s Occupational Patterns

Statement of Purpose: Changes or shifts in patterns of human occupation are poorly understood. In 1994 Royeen presented one of the earliest explorations of paradigmatic shifts in human occupation. Subsequently, others have explored a range of issues regarding patterns of occupations across the lifespan including Eakman and Edlund (2012).The purpose of this paper is to revisit Royeen’s (1994) work and to integrate critical concepts in occupational science literature to an updated conceptual model.

Description of Methods: In this qualitative research presentation, a descriptive self-referenced case study will be delineated as what Merriam called a legitimate research design (1988). Further, this illustrative, self-referenced case study is both a process and product connecting personal experiences to a larger understanding. Data collected and used in the case study are documents, reflective journal writing, and repeated analysis using the COPM, e-mail conversations with a key colleague, and artifacts from travel, art and other forms of doing. The case study design and timeline (6 months) will be presented including (a) what data was collected, (b) how data was collected, (c) critical temporal events, (d) methods of reflexive analysis of the data, and (e) criteria for data interpretation including issues of trustworthiness of the data.

Report of Results: Emerging themes of the descriptive, self-referenced case study will be discussed and critiqued as follows. First, the theme of occupational integrity and occupational identify across changes in life patterns will be discussed (Bair, 2008). Second, the match of typical developmental issues of adolescence (Beckett & Taylor, 2010) with the issues of major shifts in occupational patterns as an adult will be identified and explored. Third, the theme of well-being as a renaissance and as a goal of the synthesis of occupational patterns and literature will be discussed. Fourth, a working timeline of a triad of deliberative stages of occupational sub patterns will be discussed including (1) anticipatory occupations (2) transitioning occupations, and (3) restorative occupations via searching and seeking occupational value and categorization by main, hidden or unexpected occupations will be presented and analyzed.

Discussion/implications as related to occupational science: How the results of this paper are related to and integrated with occupational science literature will be delineated. Finally, the process of descriptive case study research in this instance and as an overall methodology to advance the study of occupational science will presented and promoted. The strengths and limitations of this particular case study as well as the strengths and limitations of case study research as a tool for the investigating occupational science occupation will be posited.

Importance to Occupational Science: Certainly case study research has been critical in the development of major theorists such as Freud and Piaget: Occupational science has not fully explored its possibilities for developing knowledge and understanding in occupational science. Theoretical development as can be provided by case study research will be presented to add conceptualization and theory to understanding of patterns of occupation and key related concepts within the scope of occupational science.