Title

Meta-synthesis: Exploiting the potential for occupational science

Location

Merritt Room

Start Time

2-10-2015 3:00 PM

End Time

2-10-2015 4:30 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Meta-synthesis: Exploiting the potential for occupational science

Methodology

Meta-synthesis, qualitative, meta-ethnography

Introduction: Meta-synthesis involves taking multiple qualitative studies on the same topic and re-analysing the published findings (Murray & Stanley, 2015). The outcome of analysis is to arrive at a deeper level of understanding of the topic which has greater potency than single studies.

Statement of purpose: In this presentation I will describe what meta-synthesis is and how it might be used by researchers to build a stronger evidence base for allied health practice.

Method: To begin the meta-synthesis a clear question needs to be determined before defining search terms and selection criteria. Once the studies have been located they are appraised with regards to quality before data in the form of findings and direct quotes are extracted. Data are then analysed thematically to arrive at conceptual themes.

Findings: Methodological issues related to the difficulty with searching, quality appraisal of studies, combining studies with differing methodological approaches, the positionality of the researchers and the lack of consensus of approach will be presented. To illustrate key points and provide examples of methodological issues, might be resolved I will draw on my own experience of conducting meta-syntheses of the transition from allied health clinician to academic (Murray, Stanley & Wright, 2014) and parenting in the neonatal intensive care unit (in press).

Implications for occupational science: With careful consideration of the limitations of meta-synthesis the new conceptual knowledge derived will strengthen occupational science. This is particularly valuable and promising for a science which predominantly has qualitative studies with small sample sizes.

References

Gibbs, D., Boshoff, K., & Stanley, M. (in press). Parenting in the neonatal intensive care unit. British Journal of Occupational Therapy.

Murray, C., & Stanley, M. (2015) Meta-synthesis: Connecting islands of knowledge. In S. Nayar & M. Stanley (Eds) Qualitative research methodologies for occupational science and therapy. London: Routledge.

Murray, C., & Stanley, M., & Wright, S. (2014). The transition from nursing and allied health clinician to academic: A qualitative meta-synthesis. Nurse Educator Today, 34, 389-395.

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Oct 2nd, 3:00 PM Oct 2nd, 4:30 PM

Meta-synthesis: Exploiting the potential for occupational science

Merritt Room

Meta-synthesis: Exploiting the potential for occupational science

Methodology

Meta-synthesis, qualitative, meta-ethnography

Introduction: Meta-synthesis involves taking multiple qualitative studies on the same topic and re-analysing the published findings (Murray & Stanley, 2015). The outcome of analysis is to arrive at a deeper level of understanding of the topic which has greater potency than single studies.

Statement of purpose: In this presentation I will describe what meta-synthesis is and how it might be used by researchers to build a stronger evidence base for allied health practice.

Method: To begin the meta-synthesis a clear question needs to be determined before defining search terms and selection criteria. Once the studies have been located they are appraised with regards to quality before data in the form of findings and direct quotes are extracted. Data are then analysed thematically to arrive at conceptual themes.

Findings: Methodological issues related to the difficulty with searching, quality appraisal of studies, combining studies with differing methodological approaches, the positionality of the researchers and the lack of consensus of approach will be presented. To illustrate key points and provide examples of methodological issues, might be resolved I will draw on my own experience of conducting meta-syntheses of the transition from allied health clinician to academic (Murray, Stanley & Wright, 2014) and parenting in the neonatal intensive care unit (in press).

Implications for occupational science: With careful consideration of the limitations of meta-synthesis the new conceptual knowledge derived will strengthen occupational science. This is particularly valuable and promising for a science which predominantly has qualitative studies with small sample sizes.