Title

Interdependent identities of Filipina workers within a liminal sphere at statue square: An ethnography of a collective occupation

Location

New River Room A

Start Time

3-10-2015 1:00 PM

End Time

3-10-2015 2:30 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Using an occupational science lens, this ethnographic study of a weekly gathering of Filipina workers at Statue Square in Hong Kong shows how use of space during their collective occupational engagement has become vital to the migrants’ adaptation process. Study findings show how recurrent use of implicitly demarcated spaces led to the development of social structures with shared experiences, shared meanings, and shared identities resulting in its transformation into a liminal sphere that allow for multiple types of transformative experiences. Having interdependent self construals, the Filipina workers’ liminal spheres become venues for the much needed social and cultural contexts for bridging and rebuilding disrupted and conflicted identities.

References

Constable, N. (1997). Maid to order in Hong Kong: Stories of Filipina workers. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Constable, N. (1999). At home but not at home: Filipina narratives of ambivalent returns. Cultural Anthropology, 14(2), 203-228.

Markus, H. R., & Kitayama, S. (1991). Culture and the self: Implications for cognition, emotion, and motivation. Psychological Reviews, 98, 224-253.

Peralta-Catipon, T (2012). Collective Occupations Among Filipino Migrants: Bridging Conflicting Identities. Occupational Therapy Journal of Research, vol 32 (2),14-21.

Peralta-Catipon, T. (2009). Statue Square as a Liminal Sphere: Transforming Space and Place in Migrant Adaptation. Journal of Occupational Science, vol 16(1), 32-37.

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Oct 3rd, 1:00 PM Oct 3rd, 2:30 PM

Interdependent identities of Filipina workers within a liminal sphere at statue square: An ethnography of a collective occupation

New River Room A

Using an occupational science lens, this ethnographic study of a weekly gathering of Filipina workers at Statue Square in Hong Kong shows how use of space during their collective occupational engagement has become vital to the migrants’ adaptation process. Study findings show how recurrent use of implicitly demarcated spaces led to the development of social structures with shared experiences, shared meanings, and shared identities resulting in its transformation into a liminal sphere that allow for multiple types of transformative experiences. Having interdependent self construals, the Filipina workers’ liminal spheres become venues for the much needed social and cultural contexts for bridging and rebuilding disrupted and conflicted identities.