Title

Poster Session - Use of photographs in the study of occupations

Location

Himmarshee Room & 8th Floor Balcony

Start Time

3-10-2015 11:45 AM

End Time

3-10-2015 1:00 PM

Abstract

Intent: The intent of this presentation is to continue the dialogue in the field of occupational science regarding the use of photographs in the study of occupations and occupational implications. Photographs can be regarded as arts personifying the photographer-artist or as records displaying reality, but meaning-making is a dynamic interaction between the photographer, viewer, and the photograph whereby meaning is actively constructed and not passively received (Schwartz, 1989). Photographs could be used as an adjunct for other methods of data collection, such as interviews, surveys, or questionnaires as a resource for eliciting more information through language, which in turn serve as data to be analyzed and reported or could be used as data in their own right (Harrison, 2002). Based on a review of three research methods that use photographs, namely Photoelicitation Interview, Photovoice, and Layered analysis of photographic content in addition to author’s preliminary experience, use of photographs in studying mundane occupations, studying the properties of occupation in their own right, and addressing occupational injustice will be discussed.

Argument: Noting the struggle in the definition of occupation, Fox (2015) suggested scholarship to understand the fundamental properties of occupation. Hocking (2009) called for the study of occupations in their own right. With their ability to stimulate deeper discussions about taken-for- granted daily occupations, photographs are especially valuable in the study of various properties of daily occupations and explore meanings associated with their implications. (Hartman, Mandich, Magalhães, & Orchard, 2011).

The concept of occupational injustice, which originated in occupational science and accepted as a domain of occupational therapists is closely associated with social injustice and Photovoice method, which positions itself as the apt method to address social injustice can be used effectively to address occupational injustice.

Importance to occupational science: Occupational science concerns itself with the study of occupations and addressing issues resulting from the effects of occupations. Photographs can be a valuable tool in research of occupational science concepts.

Conclusion: Analysis of three visual research methods that use photographs and the nature of occupations provides insights regarding the usefulness of photographs in understanding the properties of occupations that are mundane and uniquely meaningful to the individual, to address occupational injustice, and to understand occupations in their own right.

Objectives for discussion period

  • Ethical considerations in the use of photographs in research
  • Practical limitations of using photographs in research, ways to overcome barriers

Keywords

Photographs, Occupations, Visual research methods

References

Fox, V. (2014). Water: A useful metaphor for occupation. Journal of Occupational Science, 1-11. doi: 10.1080/14427591.2014.897203

Harrison, B. (2002). Photographic visions and narrative inquiry. Narrative Inquiry, 12(1), 87-111. doi: 10.1075/ni.12.1.14har

Hartman, L. R., Mandich, A., Magalhães, L., & Orchard, T. (2011). How do we ‘see’ occupations? An examination of visual research methodologies in the study of human occupation. Journal of Occupational Science, 18(4), 292-305. doi: 10.1080/14427591.2011.610776

Hocking, C. (2009). The challenge of occupation: Describing the things people do. Journal of Occupational Science, 16(3), 140-150. doi: 10.1080/14427591.2009.9686655

Schwartz, D. (1989). Visual Ethnography: Using Photography in Qualitative Research. Qualitative Sociology, 12(2), 119-154

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Oct 3rd, 11:45 AM Oct 3rd, 1:00 PM

Poster Session - Use of photographs in the study of occupations

Himmarshee Room & 8th Floor Balcony

Intent: The intent of this presentation is to continue the dialogue in the field of occupational science regarding the use of photographs in the study of occupations and occupational implications. Photographs can be regarded as arts personifying the photographer-artist or as records displaying reality, but meaning-making is a dynamic interaction between the photographer, viewer, and the photograph whereby meaning is actively constructed and not passively received (Schwartz, 1989). Photographs could be used as an adjunct for other methods of data collection, such as interviews, surveys, or questionnaires as a resource for eliciting more information through language, which in turn serve as data to be analyzed and reported or could be used as data in their own right (Harrison, 2002). Based on a review of three research methods that use photographs, namely Photoelicitation Interview, Photovoice, and Layered analysis of photographic content in addition to author’s preliminary experience, use of photographs in studying mundane occupations, studying the properties of occupation in their own right, and addressing occupational injustice will be discussed.

Argument: Noting the struggle in the definition of occupation, Fox (2015) suggested scholarship to understand the fundamental properties of occupation. Hocking (2009) called for the study of occupations in their own right. With their ability to stimulate deeper discussions about taken-for- granted daily occupations, photographs are especially valuable in the study of various properties of daily occupations and explore meanings associated with their implications. (Hartman, Mandich, Magalhães, & Orchard, 2011).

The concept of occupational injustice, which originated in occupational science and accepted as a domain of occupational therapists is closely associated with social injustice and Photovoice method, which positions itself as the apt method to address social injustice can be used effectively to address occupational injustice.

Importance to occupational science: Occupational science concerns itself with the study of occupations and addressing issues resulting from the effects of occupations. Photographs can be a valuable tool in research of occupational science concepts.

Conclusion: Analysis of three visual research methods that use photographs and the nature of occupations provides insights regarding the usefulness of photographs in understanding the properties of occupations that are mundane and uniquely meaningful to the individual, to address occupational injustice, and to understand occupations in their own right.

Objectives for discussion period

  • Ethical considerations in the use of photographs in research
  • Practical limitations of using photographs in research, ways to overcome barriers

Keywords

Photographs, Occupations, Visual research methods