Title

Poster Session - The occupation of caregiving: The effects on family dynamics

Location

Himmarshee Room & 8th Floor Balcony

Start Time

3-10-2015 11:45 AM

End Time

3-10-2015 1:00 PM

Abstract

The topic of caregiving has been well researched, yet is still significantly misunderstood and misrepresented in the health care field. Much of the research performed is centered around general caregiving. With focus on specific populations, ages, and functions, the research should and can be more in depth and useful in clinical, real-life situations amongst various disciplines. The field of occupational science has the ability to contribute significantly in breaking down the occupation of caregiving and developing specific research to assist overwhelmed, over worked, stressed, and fatigued family caregivers. Some consider caregiving a co-occupation, while other do not, and furthermore some consider in order to be a co-occupation it must meet certain criteria. The definition of co-occupation is reviewed and used to compare whether caregiving should be considered a co-occupation. Family caregiving is a meaningful, yet emotional and involved occupation. In this paper, several components of family caregiving after traumatic brain injury are analyzed and discussed. The effects on family dynamics after brain injury with family caregivers is explored and suggestions for both the caregiver and recipient of care are explored for improved rehabilitation and recovery. Caregiver support is found to be a large indicator of not only happiness and improved quality for the caregiver, but also for the recipient as well. Our society relies heavily on family caregivers, yet there are limited resources available to them, especially diagnosis specific resources. Family centered care is also discussed and the importance of family centered treatment across the continuum is stressed. After the acute phase of traumatic brain injury, the patient is typically transferred from acute care to an inpatient rehabilitation program. It is at that time that the caregiving role intensifies, advocating is much more important, but yet families feel that medical professionals simultaneously decrease communication and support about their loved one. The transition from medical staff to family caregiver is explored and discussed. The occupation of caregiving comes with high expectations from other family members, friends, and medical staff, however little training is provided. Occupational balance is important in the role of caregiving in order to reduce the effects of two disruptions, occupational disruption and biographical disruption. Understanding concepts from occupational science and integrating them with the occupation of caregiving can greatly benefit interdisciplinary health professions, caregivers, family members, and persons with traumatic brain injuries or other illnesses, disabilities, or diseases.

Keywords: family caregiver, traumatic brain injury, occupational

References

Downs, M. L. (2008). Leisure routines: Parents and children with disability sharing occupation. Journal of Occupational Science, 15(2), 105-110. doi: 10.1080/14427591.2008.9686616

Hasselkus, B. R., & Murray, B. J. (2007). Everyday Occupation, Well-Being, and Identity: The Experience of Caregivers in Families With Dementia. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 61(1), 9-20. doi: 10.5014/ajot.61.1.9

Mahoney, W., & Roberts, E. (2009). Co‐occupation in a day program for adults with developmental disabilities. Journal of Occupational Science, 16(3), 170-179. doi: 10.1080/14427591.2009.9686659

Smith, J. E., & Smith, D. L. (2000). No map, no guide. Family caregivers' perspectives on their journeys through the system. Care Management Journals, 2(1), 27-33.

Turner, B., Ownsworth, T., Cornwell, P., & Fleming, J. (2009). Reengagement in Meaningful Occupations During the Transition From Hospital to Home for People With Acquired Brain Injury and Their Family Caregivers. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 63(5), 609-620. doi: 10.5014/ajot.63.5.609

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Oct 3rd, 11:45 AM Oct 3rd, 1:00 PM

Poster Session - The occupation of caregiving: The effects on family dynamics

Himmarshee Room & 8th Floor Balcony

The topic of caregiving has been well researched, yet is still significantly misunderstood and misrepresented in the health care field. Much of the research performed is centered around general caregiving. With focus on specific populations, ages, and functions, the research should and can be more in depth and useful in clinical, real-life situations amongst various disciplines. The field of occupational science has the ability to contribute significantly in breaking down the occupation of caregiving and developing specific research to assist overwhelmed, over worked, stressed, and fatigued family caregivers. Some consider caregiving a co-occupation, while other do not, and furthermore some consider in order to be a co-occupation it must meet certain criteria. The definition of co-occupation is reviewed and used to compare whether caregiving should be considered a co-occupation. Family caregiving is a meaningful, yet emotional and involved occupation. In this paper, several components of family caregiving after traumatic brain injury are analyzed and discussed. The effects on family dynamics after brain injury with family caregivers is explored and suggestions for both the caregiver and recipient of care are explored for improved rehabilitation and recovery. Caregiver support is found to be a large indicator of not only happiness and improved quality for the caregiver, but also for the recipient as well. Our society relies heavily on family caregivers, yet there are limited resources available to them, especially diagnosis specific resources. Family centered care is also discussed and the importance of family centered treatment across the continuum is stressed. After the acute phase of traumatic brain injury, the patient is typically transferred from acute care to an inpatient rehabilitation program. It is at that time that the caregiving role intensifies, advocating is much more important, but yet families feel that medical professionals simultaneously decrease communication and support about their loved one. The transition from medical staff to family caregiver is explored and discussed. The occupation of caregiving comes with high expectations from other family members, friends, and medical staff, however little training is provided. Occupational balance is important in the role of caregiving in order to reduce the effects of two disruptions, occupational disruption and biographical disruption. Understanding concepts from occupational science and integrating them with the occupation of caregiving can greatly benefit interdisciplinary health professions, caregivers, family members, and persons with traumatic brain injuries or other illnesses, disabilities, or diseases.

Keywords: family caregiver, traumatic brain injury, occupational