Title

Occupation-based fieldwork: The importance of an occupational science perspective when designing an international occupational therapy fieldwork experience

Location

New River Room A

Start Time

3-10-2015 1:00 PM

End Time

3-10-2015 2:30 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Background: It is imperative that today’s health care professions adopt a holistic and occupation-based perspective that embodies health and wellness (Frank, 2012). The interdisciplinary work of occupational science and occupational therapy can offer a dynamic perspective to future scientists, therapists and educators. Interdisciplinary work care can achieved in occupational therapy fieldwork experiences, and facilitate future clinicians to gain an understanding on the innate need of humans to be occupied by meaningful occupations.

Purpose of the Study: To examine the lived experiences of occupational therapy students who are participating in an international Level I fieldwork experience in Ibarra, Ecuador: May 2nd-May 11th, 2015. This study has been designed from an occupational science perspective. The goal of this qualitative study is to assess the students’ perception of: occupation, cultural diversity, client-centered care, and the role they can assume as future clinicians.

Research Design: A phenomenological approach will be utilized to gain insight on the lived experiences of occupational therapy students who are participating in fieldwork abroad. Phenomenological research studies are beneficial for both occupational science and occupational therapy; and will help participants gain awareness of their experience abroad.

The qualitative data will be collected during the nine day fieldwork experience in Ecuador. The student participants will participate in three semi-structured interviews and a group debriefing. Three semi-structured interviews will occur on days: three, six and nine and will consist of informal and open-ended questions.

The semi-structured interviews and group debriefing will be digitally recorded, transcribed, and undergo thematic analysis. The research data will be themed according to the Braun & Clarke (2006) six steps of thematic analysis.

Trustworthiness will be ensured by triangulation. The semi-structured interviews and debriefing will be coded separately, and a comparison of themes will be performed. Member checking will occur to ensure correct themes were discovered. A reflexive approach will be integrated into the data analysis; and will contribute to the insight gained on the participants’ perceived experience.

Intent: The integration of occupational science into occupational therapy fieldwork can provide an enriched understanding of the occupations and lived experiences of students, and their awareness on culture and occupation. This study will illustrate a need for further collaborative research between occupational science and occupational therapy to ensure a global focus on occupation, health and wellness.

Conclusion: Culturally-inclusive research is required on behalf of occupational science and occupational therapy to meet the evolving needs of a globally connected environment. A client-centered perspective that is driven by the client, versus the influence of the therapist will revolutionize global occupational engagement (Martin, Martos, Millares & Bjorklund, 2015).

Contribution to occupational science: Collaborative efforts between occupational science and occupational therapy can ensure a global focus and culturally-inclusive health.

Objectives for Discussion:

  1. To engage in discussion on global occupations and need for culturally-inclusive educational experiences.
  2. Discuss results from qualitative study: identify themes discovered from an occupational science perspective.
  3. Dialog about future areas of study: collaborative ways to prepare future clinicians and scientists to meet diverse needs of global community.

Key words: occupational therapy, occupational science, international fieldwork

References

Braun, V. & Clarke, V. (2006). Using thematic analysis in psychology. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3, 77-101.

Frank, G. (2012). The 2010 Ruth Zemke Lecture in Occupational Therapy/Occupational Science/Occupational Justice: Moral Commitments and Global Assemblages. Journal of Occupational Science, 19 (1), 25-35.

Martin, I. Z., Martos, J., A., Millares, P. M., Bjorklund, A. (2015). Occupational therapy culture seen through the multifocal lens of fieldwork in diverse rural areas. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 22, 82-94.

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Oct 3rd, 1:00 PM Oct 3rd, 2:30 PM

Occupation-based fieldwork: The importance of an occupational science perspective when designing an international occupational therapy fieldwork experience

New River Room A

Background: It is imperative that today’s health care professions adopt a holistic and occupation-based perspective that embodies health and wellness (Frank, 2012). The interdisciplinary work of occupational science and occupational therapy can offer a dynamic perspective to future scientists, therapists and educators. Interdisciplinary work care can achieved in occupational therapy fieldwork experiences, and facilitate future clinicians to gain an understanding on the innate need of humans to be occupied by meaningful occupations.

Purpose of the Study: To examine the lived experiences of occupational therapy students who are participating in an international Level I fieldwork experience in Ibarra, Ecuador: May 2nd-May 11th, 2015. This study has been designed from an occupational science perspective. The goal of this qualitative study is to assess the students’ perception of: occupation, cultural diversity, client-centered care, and the role they can assume as future clinicians.

Research Design: A phenomenological approach will be utilized to gain insight on the lived experiences of occupational therapy students who are participating in fieldwork abroad. Phenomenological research studies are beneficial for both occupational science and occupational therapy; and will help participants gain awareness of their experience abroad.

The qualitative data will be collected during the nine day fieldwork experience in Ecuador. The student participants will participate in three semi-structured interviews and a group debriefing. Three semi-structured interviews will occur on days: three, six and nine and will consist of informal and open-ended questions.

The semi-structured interviews and group debriefing will be digitally recorded, transcribed, and undergo thematic analysis. The research data will be themed according to the Braun & Clarke (2006) six steps of thematic analysis.

Trustworthiness will be ensured by triangulation. The semi-structured interviews and debriefing will be coded separately, and a comparison of themes will be performed. Member checking will occur to ensure correct themes were discovered. A reflexive approach will be integrated into the data analysis; and will contribute to the insight gained on the participants’ perceived experience.

Intent: The integration of occupational science into occupational therapy fieldwork can provide an enriched understanding of the occupations and lived experiences of students, and their awareness on culture and occupation. This study will illustrate a need for further collaborative research between occupational science and occupational therapy to ensure a global focus on occupation, health and wellness.

Conclusion: Culturally-inclusive research is required on behalf of occupational science and occupational therapy to meet the evolving needs of a globally connected environment. A client-centered perspective that is driven by the client, versus the influence of the therapist will revolutionize global occupational engagement (Martin, Martos, Millares & Bjorklund, 2015).

Contribution to occupational science: Collaborative efforts between occupational science and occupational therapy can ensure a global focus and culturally-inclusive health.

Objectives for Discussion:

  1. To engage in discussion on global occupations and need for culturally-inclusive educational experiences.
  2. Discuss results from qualitative study: identify themes discovered from an occupational science perspective.
  3. Dialog about future areas of study: collaborative ways to prepare future clinicians and scientists to meet diverse needs of global community.

Key words: occupational therapy, occupational science, international fieldwork