Title

Cultivating mindfulness to alleviate boredom

Location

New River Room A

Start Time

3-10-2015 1:00 PM

End Time

3-10-2015 2:30 PM

Session Type

Theoretical Paper

Abstract

Abstract

The purpose of this theoretical paper is to identify how an interdisciplinary collaborative effort between occupational therapists, occupational scientists, speech language pathologists, and physical therapists can promote mindfulness to alleviate boredom. First, the paper will establish the sources of boredom, such as low situational demands (client has much higher abilities than demanded by a situation) or poor abilities (demands are too high for a client’s abilities). Next, the paper will address if boredom is the result of occupational deprivation or the result of excessive opportunities. Martin, Sadlo, and Stew (2012) state “we have developed immunity to this onslaught, requiring even higher levels of sensory stimulation to reach our consciousness” (p. 59). Then, the research will delve into the societal aspects of boredom occurring in the United States, including “lack of engagement in productive occupations such as education and work” (Farnworth, 1998, p. 140). Finally, the paper will analyze ways to develop mindfulness to eliminate boredom and create life balance, by cultivating the core building blocks of intention, attention, and a mindful way attitude (Reid, 2011). This theoretical paper will conclude with real-world examples of how an interdisciplinary group can infuse mindfulness into occupation.

Keywords: boredom, mindfulness, occupational deprivation

References

Elliot, M. L. (2011). Being mindful about mindfulness: An invitation to extend occupational engagement into the growing mindfulness discourse. Journal of Occupational Science, 18(4), 366-376. doi:10.1080/14427591.2011.610777

Farnworth, L. (1998). Doing, being, and boredom. Journal of Occupational Science, 5(3), 140-146.

Jong, H. W. (2013). Mindfulness and spirituality as predictors of personal maturity beyond influence of personality traits. Mental Health, Religion, & Culture, 16(1), 38-57. doi:10.1080/13674676.2011.644782

Martin, M., Sadlo, G., & Stew, G. (2012). Rethinking occupational deprivation and boredom. Journal of Occupational Science, 19(1), 54-61. doi:10.1080/14427591.2011.640210

Reid, D. (2011). Mindfulness and flow in occupational engagement: Presence in doing. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 78(1), 50-56. doi:10.2182/cjot.2011.78.1.7

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Oct 3rd, 1:00 PM Oct 3rd, 2:30 PM

Cultivating mindfulness to alleviate boredom

New River Room A

Abstract

The purpose of this theoretical paper is to identify how an interdisciplinary collaborative effort between occupational therapists, occupational scientists, speech language pathologists, and physical therapists can promote mindfulness to alleviate boredom. First, the paper will establish the sources of boredom, such as low situational demands (client has much higher abilities than demanded by a situation) or poor abilities (demands are too high for a client’s abilities). Next, the paper will address if boredom is the result of occupational deprivation or the result of excessive opportunities. Martin, Sadlo, and Stew (2012) state “we have developed immunity to this onslaught, requiring even higher levels of sensory stimulation to reach our consciousness” (p. 59). Then, the research will delve into the societal aspects of boredom occurring in the United States, including “lack of engagement in productive occupations such as education and work” (Farnworth, 1998, p. 140). Finally, the paper will analyze ways to develop mindfulness to eliminate boredom and create life balance, by cultivating the core building blocks of intention, attention, and a mindful way attitude (Reid, 2011). This theoretical paper will conclude with real-world examples of how an interdisciplinary group can infuse mindfulness into occupation.

Keywords: boredom, mindfulness, occupational deprivation