Title

The development of ADLs as occupations in OS and OT

Location

New River Room B

Start Time

3-10-2015 1:00 PM

End Time

3-10-2015 2:30 PM

Session Type

Theoretical Paper

Abstract

Background & Rationale: In 1917, when occupational therapy was formally organized, there was no such area of occupation as ADL, daily living skills, or everyday living activities as we know them today. Occupational therapy practice was organized around scheduling daily events (habit training), work activities for the institution (cooking, clothing, gardening, making mattresses and brooms), reconstruction work (strengthening, work tolerance, curative workshop) and convalescent work (homebound work, sheltered workshops, homemade arts and crafts). Evaluating daily living skills began in 1935 with Margaret Sheldon’s work, who was a physical educator (Sheldon, 1935) but did not have significant influence on occupational therapy until the 1950 time period (Livingston, 1950); some 30 plus years after the formal beginning of occupational therapy

Statement of Intent: The purpose is to illustrate the development of an area or category of occupation and how it became part of the organization of activities or tasks recognized as occupations in the practice of occupational therapy beginning in 1935 in education through development in physical therapy (Deaver & Brown, 1946) to the present statement in the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework, Third Edition (2014).

Argument: Occupation is an evolving area of study in and of itself. What is classified as occupation changes over time and will likely change in the future. This review of ADLs as a recognized area of occupation is designed as an example of how the study of occupation arises.

Importance to OS. OS is the major area of study designed to explore and bring to our attention how and where occupation is occurring and may have implications for the practice of occupational therapy. Reviewing the rise of ADLs as a focus of study may provide guidelines for recognizing and documenting changes in the focus on occupation in the future.

Conclusions: The study of occupation is a fluid and changing process influenced by what is viewed as important human activities at any given time and place. The study of ADLs illustrates the dynamics of changing views of occupation. Such changes will likely occur again. Can we learn from the past to illuminate the future?

Key Words: Activities of daily living, physical demands of daily living, achievement record

Learning/Discussion Objectives

  • Document and trace the beginning of ADLs as an occupation or group of occupations
  • Explore the interdisciplinary process of identifying and clarifying occupation
  • Illustrate how the study of occupation can change from initial recognition to current status

References

American Occupational Therapy Association (2014) Occupational Therapy Practice Framework, 3rd ed. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 68(2, Supplement), S1-S51

Deaver, G.G. & Brown, M.E. (1945). Physical demands of daily life. New York: Institute for Crippled and Disabled.

Livingston, D.M. (1950). Achievement recording for the cerebral palsied. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 4, 66-67, 74.

Sheldon, M.P. (1935). A physical achievement record. Journal of Health and Physical Education, 6, 30-31.

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Oct 3rd, 1:00 PM Oct 3rd, 2:30 PM

The development of ADLs as occupations in OS and OT

New River Room B

Background & Rationale: In 1917, when occupational therapy was formally organized, there was no such area of occupation as ADL, daily living skills, or everyday living activities as we know them today. Occupational therapy practice was organized around scheduling daily events (habit training), work activities for the institution (cooking, clothing, gardening, making mattresses and brooms), reconstruction work (strengthening, work tolerance, curative workshop) and convalescent work (homebound work, sheltered workshops, homemade arts and crafts). Evaluating daily living skills began in 1935 with Margaret Sheldon’s work, who was a physical educator (Sheldon, 1935) but did not have significant influence on occupational therapy until the 1950 time period (Livingston, 1950); some 30 plus years after the formal beginning of occupational therapy

Statement of Intent: The purpose is to illustrate the development of an area or category of occupation and how it became part of the organization of activities or tasks recognized as occupations in the practice of occupational therapy beginning in 1935 in education through development in physical therapy (Deaver & Brown, 1946) to the present statement in the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework, Third Edition (2014).

Argument: Occupation is an evolving area of study in and of itself. What is classified as occupation changes over time and will likely change in the future. This review of ADLs as a recognized area of occupation is designed as an example of how the study of occupation arises.

Importance to OS. OS is the major area of study designed to explore and bring to our attention how and where occupation is occurring and may have implications for the practice of occupational therapy. Reviewing the rise of ADLs as a focus of study may provide guidelines for recognizing and documenting changes in the focus on occupation in the future.

Conclusions: The study of occupation is a fluid and changing process influenced by what is viewed as important human activities at any given time and place. The study of ADLs illustrates the dynamics of changing views of occupation. Such changes will likely occur again. Can we learn from the past to illuminate the future?

Key Words: Activities of daily living, physical demands of daily living, achievement record

Learning/Discussion Objectives

  • Document and trace the beginning of ADLs as an occupation or group of occupations
  • Explore the interdisciplinary process of identifying and clarifying occupation
  • Illustrate how the study of occupation can change from initial recognition to current status