Title

Working in multi-disciplinary teams: Drawing on the alone in a crowd experience

Location

New River Room B

Start Time

3-10-2015 2:30 PM

End Time

3-10-2015 4:00 PM

Session Type

Theoretical Paper

Abstract

Inter-disciplinary collaborations

collaboration, theoretical lenses, inter-disciplinary

Introduction: Early founders of occupational science such as Ann Wilcock envisioned an inter-disciplinary science however occupational scientists are predominantly occupational therapists. One way of developing the field of occupational science is to participate in inter-disciplinary research teams on research studies bringing an occupational perspective to the focus of inquiry. Indeed having a inter-disciplinary team increases the chances of the project being funded in many large research grant schemes.

Intent: In this presentation I will share my experience of being part of an inter-disciplinary team on a nationally funded project exploring loneliness and older people (Stanley et al, 2010). I was the only occupational therapist/ scientist on this team along with nurse researchers, sociologists and aged care administrators. The project was also conducted across two states with the chief investigator in another country and thus three different time zones.

Argument: The presentation will focus on the strengths and limitations of working within an inter-disciplinary team. Whilst I anticipated that I could approach the data from an occupational perspective the data was far more occupational than I ever imagined and my team members could see that without adopting my occupational lenses. Some of the challenges of working as a team came from the different lenses that we brought to data analysis as well as the different expectations of the research process. These were resolved by keeping communication channels open and making space for robust discussions.

Implications for occupational science: Recommendations from this experience for occupational scientists are to have early conversations about publications and authorship and document agreements made, as well as establishing good working relationships to enable frank, hones robust conversations when differences arise. The strength of the inter-disciplinary team comes from the contributions from multiple perspectives to build the depth of findings.

References

Stanley, M., Moyle, W., Ballantyne, A., Jaworski, K., Corlis, M., Oxlade, D., Stoll, A., & Young, B. (2010). “Nowadays you don’t even see your neighbours”: Loneliness in the everyday lives of older Australians. Health and Social Care in the Community, 18 (4), 407-414. Doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2524.2010.00923,x

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Oct 3rd, 2:30 PM Oct 3rd, 4:00 PM

Working in multi-disciplinary teams: Drawing on the alone in a crowd experience

New River Room B

Inter-disciplinary collaborations

collaboration, theoretical lenses, inter-disciplinary

Introduction: Early founders of occupational science such as Ann Wilcock envisioned an inter-disciplinary science however occupational scientists are predominantly occupational therapists. One way of developing the field of occupational science is to participate in inter-disciplinary research teams on research studies bringing an occupational perspective to the focus of inquiry. Indeed having a inter-disciplinary team increases the chances of the project being funded in many large research grant schemes.

Intent: In this presentation I will share my experience of being part of an inter-disciplinary team on a nationally funded project exploring loneliness and older people (Stanley et al, 2010). I was the only occupational therapist/ scientist on this team along with nurse researchers, sociologists and aged care administrators. The project was also conducted across two states with the chief investigator in another country and thus three different time zones.

Argument: The presentation will focus on the strengths and limitations of working within an inter-disciplinary team. Whilst I anticipated that I could approach the data from an occupational perspective the data was far more occupational than I ever imagined and my team members could see that without adopting my occupational lenses. Some of the challenges of working as a team came from the different lenses that we brought to data analysis as well as the different expectations of the research process. These were resolved by keeping communication channels open and making space for robust discussions.

Implications for occupational science: Recommendations from this experience for occupational scientists are to have early conversations about publications and authorship and document agreements made, as well as establishing good working relationships to enable frank, hones robust conversations when differences arise. The strength of the inter-disciplinary team comes from the contributions from multiple perspectives to build the depth of findings.