Title

Critical thinking about occupation: a framework for guiding pedagogy in occupational therapy

1

Location

Regency Room

Start Time

29-9-2016 2:00 PM

End Time

29-9-2016 3:30 PM

Session Type

Theoretical Paper

Abstract

Title:

Critical thinking about occupation: a framework for guiding pedagogy in occupational therapy

Type of session:

Theoretical paper

Keywords:

critical thinking, occupation, theory development

Intent:

This theoretical paper presents our initial proposed framework for critical thinking about occupation. Literature review and a practical scenario are used to illustrate critical thinking about occupation as different from professional reasoning (Facione & Facione, 1996; Schell & Cervero, 1993). Models and frameworks of critical thinking from other disciplines are examined in relationship to occupation (Moseley et al., 2005).

Argument:

Critical thinking about occupation is a foundation that needs to be explicitly taught in the occupational therapy curriculum--before and while teaching professional reasoning. Critical thinking about occupation is different from the application of professional reasoning in practice, as critical thinking requires deep understanding of the underlying structure of the discipline. Although there has been renewed focus on deep learning about occupation (Hooper et al., 2014), currently there is no existing framework for teaching critical thinking about occupation. We present an initial framework with elements of information gathering, building understanding, and productive thinking interacting with strategic and reflective thinking about occupation.

Importance to occupational science:

Occupational science is the conceptual and empirical basis for the practice of occupational therapy, and informs pedagogical approaches to teaching the epistemology of the discipline of occupational therapy. A recognized framework for teaching critical thinking about occupation may increase awareness of the need to include occupational science in the occupational therapy curriculum.

Conclusion:

This is an invitation for dialog that will inform development of a framework for teaching critical thinking about occupation. We argue that critical thinking about occupation is distinct from professional reasoning in occupational therapy, and that occupational science directly informs this critical thinking.

Questions to facilitate discussion:

  1. Taking a look at the elements and processes in our framework- how do you see these holding true as you teach critical thinking about occupation? What elements are supported? What elements are missing?
  2. What examples do you have of pedagogical methods that explicitly promote critical thinking about occupation?
  3. What opportunities exist for the measurement of growth in critical thinking about occupation in learners across a curriculum?
  4. What are some examples of how occupational science research could be integrated into occupational therapy curricula as a method for teaching critical thinking about occupation?

References

References:

Facione, N.C. & Facione, P.A. (1996). Externalizing the critical thinking in knowledge development and clinical judgment. Nursing Outlook, 44, 129-136.

Hooper, B., Krishnagiri, S., Price, M.P., Bilics, A.R., Taff, S.D., & Mitcham, M.D. (2014). Value and challenges of research on health professions’ core subjects in education. Journal of Allied Health, 43(4), 187-193.

Moseley, D., Elliot, J., Gregson, M., & Higgins, S. (2005). Thinking skills frameworks for use in education and training. British Educational Research Journal, 31(3), 367-390.

Schell, B.A., & Cervero, R.M. (1993). Clinical reasoning in occupational therapy: An integrative review. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 47, 605-610. doi:10.5014/ajot.47.7.605

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Sep 29th, 2:00 PM Sep 29th, 3:30 PM

Critical thinking about occupation: a framework for guiding pedagogy in occupational therapy

Regency Room

Title:

Critical thinking about occupation: a framework for guiding pedagogy in occupational therapy

Type of session:

Theoretical paper

Keywords:

critical thinking, occupation, theory development

Intent:

This theoretical paper presents our initial proposed framework for critical thinking about occupation. Literature review and a practical scenario are used to illustrate critical thinking about occupation as different from professional reasoning (Facione & Facione, 1996; Schell & Cervero, 1993). Models and frameworks of critical thinking from other disciplines are examined in relationship to occupation (Moseley et al., 2005).

Argument:

Critical thinking about occupation is a foundation that needs to be explicitly taught in the occupational therapy curriculum--before and while teaching professional reasoning. Critical thinking about occupation is different from the application of professional reasoning in practice, as critical thinking requires deep understanding of the underlying structure of the discipline. Although there has been renewed focus on deep learning about occupation (Hooper et al., 2014), currently there is no existing framework for teaching critical thinking about occupation. We present an initial framework with elements of information gathering, building understanding, and productive thinking interacting with strategic and reflective thinking about occupation.

Importance to occupational science:

Occupational science is the conceptual and empirical basis for the practice of occupational therapy, and informs pedagogical approaches to teaching the epistemology of the discipline of occupational therapy. A recognized framework for teaching critical thinking about occupation may increase awareness of the need to include occupational science in the occupational therapy curriculum.

Conclusion:

This is an invitation for dialog that will inform development of a framework for teaching critical thinking about occupation. We argue that critical thinking about occupation is distinct from professional reasoning in occupational therapy, and that occupational science directly informs this critical thinking.

Questions to facilitate discussion:

  1. Taking a look at the elements and processes in our framework- how do you see these holding true as you teach critical thinking about occupation? What elements are supported? What elements are missing?
  2. What examples do you have of pedagogical methods that explicitly promote critical thinking about occupation?
  3. What opportunities exist for the measurement of growth in critical thinking about occupation in learners across a curriculum?
  4. What are some examples of how occupational science research could be integrated into occupational therapy curricula as a method for teaching critical thinking about occupation?