Title

The development of occupational science outside the Anglophone sphere: Enacting global collaboration

1

Location

Portland Room

Start Time

29-9-2016 8:30 AM

End Time

29-9-2016 10:00 AM

Session Type

Forum

Abstract

Aims/intent: The aims of this forum are to: a) engage the audience in a collective dialogue around the diverse ways in which occupational science is developing outside the Anglophone sphere, b) enable reflexivity about the opportunities and challenges present in non-English speaking countries attempting to develop occupational science c) reveal linguistic and contextual factors that may hinder or facilitate global collaboration within occupational science, and d) identify potential opportunities to increase global collaboration between occupational scientists from diverse geographical locations.

Rationale: Occupational science is at a crucial moment of disciplinary development characterized by critical reflexivity regarding its foundational assumptions and calls for a more critical and socially responsive discipline. Upon entering its third decade, an impressive body of scholarly work has been produced and several authors have raised concerns regarding the dominance of an Anglophonic and Eurocentric orientation within occupational science, informed by ideas dominant in the “Western” world (Kantartzis & Molineux, 2011; Magalhães, 2012; Prodinger & Stamm, 2012). In parallel, calls to incorporate diverse perspectives and voices from diverse geographical points have also materialized. Nevertheless, despite this expansion, the emergence of occupational science in non-English speaking countries has not happened at the same pace and fashion as in its Anglophone counterparts. Epistemological, cultural, and institutional characteristics may explain the variances. However, power dynamics amongst countries and institutions must be acknowledged and addressed in order to afford global collaboration (Molke & Laliberte-Rudman, 2008).

Potential outcomes for participants: This forum contributes to the development of an occupational science that is open to diverse worldviews to avoid enacting colonial agendas that limit the discipline’s expansion and understanding of the diversity of ways occupation is understood and enacted worldwide.

Discussion questions to facilitate occupational science concepts and ideas:

  • Is there a space within occupational science for diverse scholarship of occupation developed within other areas of the world?
  • Is there space within occupational science to embrace diverse conceptualizations of “occupation” that reflect other types of knowledges and viewpoints?
  • What kind of strategies could be developed to embrace global collaboration?

Key words: epistemology, global development, reflexivity

References

References:

Kantartzis, S., & Molineux, M. (2011). The influence of western society's construction of a healthy daily life on the conceptualisation of occupation. Journal of Occupational Science, 18(1), 62-80.

Magalhães, L. (2012). What would Paulo Freire think of occupational science? Occupational science: Society, inclusion, participation, Blackwell Publishing, 8-19

Molke, D. K., & Laliberte-Rudman, D. (2008). Governing the majority world? Critical reflections on the role of occupation technology in international contexts. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 56(4), 239_248

Prodinger, B., & Stamm, T. A. (2012). The emergence of occupational science in Austria: An insider perspective. Journal of Occupational Science, 19(2), 127-137.

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Sep 29th, 8:30 AM Sep 29th, 10:00 AM

The development of occupational science outside the Anglophone sphere: Enacting global collaboration

Portland Room

Aims/intent: The aims of this forum are to: a) engage the audience in a collective dialogue around the diverse ways in which occupational science is developing outside the Anglophone sphere, b) enable reflexivity about the opportunities and challenges present in non-English speaking countries attempting to develop occupational science c) reveal linguistic and contextual factors that may hinder or facilitate global collaboration within occupational science, and d) identify potential opportunities to increase global collaboration between occupational scientists from diverse geographical locations.

Rationale: Occupational science is at a crucial moment of disciplinary development characterized by critical reflexivity regarding its foundational assumptions and calls for a more critical and socially responsive discipline. Upon entering its third decade, an impressive body of scholarly work has been produced and several authors have raised concerns regarding the dominance of an Anglophonic and Eurocentric orientation within occupational science, informed by ideas dominant in the “Western” world (Kantartzis & Molineux, 2011; Magalhães, 2012; Prodinger & Stamm, 2012). In parallel, calls to incorporate diverse perspectives and voices from diverse geographical points have also materialized. Nevertheless, despite this expansion, the emergence of occupational science in non-English speaking countries has not happened at the same pace and fashion as in its Anglophone counterparts. Epistemological, cultural, and institutional characteristics may explain the variances. However, power dynamics amongst countries and institutions must be acknowledged and addressed in order to afford global collaboration (Molke & Laliberte-Rudman, 2008).

Potential outcomes for participants: This forum contributes to the development of an occupational science that is open to diverse worldviews to avoid enacting colonial agendas that limit the discipline’s expansion and understanding of the diversity of ways occupation is understood and enacted worldwide.

Discussion questions to facilitate occupational science concepts and ideas:

  • Is there a space within occupational science for diverse scholarship of occupation developed within other areas of the world?
  • Is there space within occupational science to embrace diverse conceptualizations of “occupation” that reflect other types of knowledges and viewpoints?
  • What kind of strategies could be developed to embrace global collaboration?

Key words: epistemology, global development, reflexivity