Title

Exploring the Meaning of Recovery to Individuals Diagnosed with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness

1

Location

Regency Room

Start Time

29-9-2016 8:30 AM

End Time

29-9-2016 10:00 AM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Title: Exploring the Meaning of Recovery to Individuals Diagnosed with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness

Purpose: Recovery from mental illness is a complex, multidimensional experience. As mental illness is a growing cause of disability worldwide with significant social, economic, and human rights consequences, there is a need to learn how individuals diagnosed with mental illness perceive their own recovery so that their voices can be heard and person-centered and occupation-based assessments and interventions can be developed. A research study was conducted in which authors explored how individuals diagnosed with severe and persistent mental illness describe their own recovery process.

Method: Researchers used a phenomenological research design with a photovoice method to understand the lived experience and meaning of recovery to 8 individuals diagnosed with mental illness. Grounded in critical consciousness theory, feminist theory, and documentary photography, photovoice is a research method that combines photography and group work to allow participants to record, share, and reflect on their experiences. Participants were recruited from a mental health clubhouse in an urban, Midwestern city. Through a series of focus group interviews, the method provided chances to hear directly from consumers as they described their experiences by taking photographs, assembling photobooks, and discussing factors that support and hinder recovery. Audio-recordings and field notes from focus group sessions were transcribed, and line-by-line coding was used to identify categories. Additionally, participants’ photographs with corresponding narrations were sorted and coded to create themes. Once the researchers produced final themes, a member-checking session was conducted with the participants to corroborate findings and increase the trustworthiness of the study.

Results: Data analysis produced themes related to caring relationships; leisure and outings; and relaxation, stress reduction, and coping. The results of this study showed that photography, journaling about photos, and making photobooks or scrapbooks are all leisure activities that can be an inspiring and creative channel for coping with the symptoms of mental illness.

Implications to occupational science: The results of this study exposed many significant occupations that impact recovery for people diagnosed with mental illness. This paper focuses on the transactional nature of activity, occupational choices, and occupational patterns of adults with serious and persistent mental illness and their impact on journeys of recovery.

Discussion Questions

  1. How does engagement in meaningful occupation affect health and well-being in adults with mental illness?

  2. Describe the global social issues and prevailing health and welfare needs of individuals with mental illness.

  3. What are the wellness needs of individuals who are experiencing or are at risk for social injustice and occupational deprivation?

References

Creswell, J. W. (2012). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Doroud, N., Fossey, E., & Fortune, T. (2015). Recovery as an occupational journey: A scoping review exploring the links between occupational engagement and recovery for people with enduring mental health issues. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 62, 378-392. doi: 10.1111/1440-1630.12238

Fidler, G. S., & Velde, B. P. (1999). Activities: Reality and symbol. Thorofare, NJ: Slack Incorporated.

Horghagen, S., Fostvedt, B., Alsaker, S. (2014). Craft activities in groups at meeting places: supporting mental health users' everyday occupations. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 21(2), 145-152. doi:10.3109/11038128.2013.866691

Wang, C., & Burris, M. A. (1997). Photovoice: Concept, methodology, and use for participatory needs assessment. Health Education & Behavior, 24, 369-387. doi: 10.1177/109019819702400309

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Sep 29th, 8:30 AM Sep 29th, 10:00 AM

Exploring the Meaning of Recovery to Individuals Diagnosed with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness

Regency Room

Title: Exploring the Meaning of Recovery to Individuals Diagnosed with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness

Purpose: Recovery from mental illness is a complex, multidimensional experience. As mental illness is a growing cause of disability worldwide with significant social, economic, and human rights consequences, there is a need to learn how individuals diagnosed with mental illness perceive their own recovery so that their voices can be heard and person-centered and occupation-based assessments and interventions can be developed. A research study was conducted in which authors explored how individuals diagnosed with severe and persistent mental illness describe their own recovery process.

Method: Researchers used a phenomenological research design with a photovoice method to understand the lived experience and meaning of recovery to 8 individuals diagnosed with mental illness. Grounded in critical consciousness theory, feminist theory, and documentary photography, photovoice is a research method that combines photography and group work to allow participants to record, share, and reflect on their experiences. Participants were recruited from a mental health clubhouse in an urban, Midwestern city. Through a series of focus group interviews, the method provided chances to hear directly from consumers as they described their experiences by taking photographs, assembling photobooks, and discussing factors that support and hinder recovery. Audio-recordings and field notes from focus group sessions were transcribed, and line-by-line coding was used to identify categories. Additionally, participants’ photographs with corresponding narrations were sorted and coded to create themes. Once the researchers produced final themes, a member-checking session was conducted with the participants to corroborate findings and increase the trustworthiness of the study.

Results: Data analysis produced themes related to caring relationships; leisure and outings; and relaxation, stress reduction, and coping. The results of this study showed that photography, journaling about photos, and making photobooks or scrapbooks are all leisure activities that can be an inspiring and creative channel for coping with the symptoms of mental illness.

Implications to occupational science: The results of this study exposed many significant occupations that impact recovery for people diagnosed with mental illness. This paper focuses on the transactional nature of activity, occupational choices, and occupational patterns of adults with serious and persistent mental illness and their impact on journeys of recovery.

Discussion Questions

  1. How does engagement in meaningful occupation affect health and well-being in adults with mental illness?

  2. Describe the global social issues and prevailing health and welfare needs of individuals with mental illness.

  3. What are the wellness needs of individuals who are experiencing or are at risk for social injustice and occupational deprivation?