Title

Design, the built environment, and pedagogy: The interaction occurring through occupation of active learning.

1

Location

Armory Room

Start Time

30-9-2016 8:30 AM

End Time

30-9-2016 10:00 AM

Session Type

Theoretical Paper

Abstract

Key Words:

Active Learning

Classroom Design

Occupational Transaction

Intent

The intent of this theoretical paper is to elucidate the connection between design and occupation applied to active learning in the college classroom. The paper will apply models of occupational science including the Transactional Model, and the Model of Person Object Interaction to understand why design is theorized to impact engagement in learning from an occupational science perspective. The discussion will differentiate views from educational, aesthetic, and psychological orientations, thus uncovering the unique contribution of occupational science. Additionally, the application of these theories will help us to illustrate various components which influence the manifestation of both active and passive engagement in the occupation of learning.

Argument

Active learning is currently considered a pre-eminent educational strategy. The positive effect of design on active learning is touted by designers and institutions of higher learning. Psychological literature focuses on the connection between environment and behavior in terms of perceived quality and impulse control, as well as the feeling conveyed non-verbally in a space. Educational literature has explored the concept of built pedagogy (Monahan, 2002) focusing on the flexibility of spaces and the relationship with pedagogical practices. Occupational science can contribute to the design of spaces and development of pedagogical practices via deep exploration of the variety of influences on this occupation. Further, application of active learning to occupational science theories will further enhance understanding of those theories.

Importance

Application of theoretical frameworks within occupational science through which we can analyze the design, affordances, and aesthetic/perceived value of the learning environment beyond the established psychology and educational research, has the potential to further the transactional occupation of active learning, thus demonstrating the unique utility of occupational science. Further, application of occupational science models to the complex interaction of factors embedded within the concept of active learning will further our understanding and refinement of occupational science models.

Conclusion

Occupational science has a unique perspective that is highly useful in understanding not only human behavior, but also the essence of human occupation in relation to the myriad of influences that exist. Occupational science allows us to look holistically at our most defining human occupations, and determine how active participation in occupation is facilitated and hindered. Application of occupational science to the relationship between active learning and design will both further the occupation of active learning, and the understanding of occupational science.

Questions

  1. How does classroom design impact the person-object interaction within the occupation of active learning?

  2. How does the manner in which process skills interact with the built environment of furniture and design impact active learning?

  3. Is there a hierarchy of occupational transactions that corresponds to levels of learning such as those categorized by Bloom?

  4. Can a rigorous framework for a hierarchy of occupational transactions be developed for specific situations such as active learning in the classroom or for occupational transaction as a whole?

  5. How can we describe the relationships between the Occupational Transaction Model and the Person-Object Interaction Model as it relates to active learning

References

Dickie, V., Cutchin, M.P., & Humphry, R. (2006). Occupation as transactional experience: A critique of individualism in occupational science. Journal of Occupational Science, 13(1), 83-93.

Hocking, C. (1997). Person-object interaction model: Understanding the use of everyday objects. Journal of Occupational Science, 4(1), 27-35.

Monahan, T. (2002). Flexible space and built pedagogy: Emerging IT embodiments. Inventio, 4(1), 1-19.

Van Note Chism, N. (2006). Challenging traditional assumptions and rethinking learning spaces. In Oblinger, D.G. (Eds.), Learning spaces (2.1-2.12), Educase available at www.educase.edu/learningspaces

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Sep 30th, 8:30 AM Sep 30th, 10:00 AM

Design, the built environment, and pedagogy: The interaction occurring through occupation of active learning.

Armory Room

Key Words:

Active Learning

Classroom Design

Occupational Transaction

Intent

The intent of this theoretical paper is to elucidate the connection between design and occupation applied to active learning in the college classroom. The paper will apply models of occupational science including the Transactional Model, and the Model of Person Object Interaction to understand why design is theorized to impact engagement in learning from an occupational science perspective. The discussion will differentiate views from educational, aesthetic, and psychological orientations, thus uncovering the unique contribution of occupational science. Additionally, the application of these theories will help us to illustrate various components which influence the manifestation of both active and passive engagement in the occupation of learning.

Argument

Active learning is currently considered a pre-eminent educational strategy. The positive effect of design on active learning is touted by designers and institutions of higher learning. Psychological literature focuses on the connection between environment and behavior in terms of perceived quality and impulse control, as well as the feeling conveyed non-verbally in a space. Educational literature has explored the concept of built pedagogy (Monahan, 2002) focusing on the flexibility of spaces and the relationship with pedagogical practices. Occupational science can contribute to the design of spaces and development of pedagogical practices via deep exploration of the variety of influences on this occupation. Further, application of active learning to occupational science theories will further enhance understanding of those theories.

Importance

Application of theoretical frameworks within occupational science through which we can analyze the design, affordances, and aesthetic/perceived value of the learning environment beyond the established psychology and educational research, has the potential to further the transactional occupation of active learning, thus demonstrating the unique utility of occupational science. Further, application of occupational science models to the complex interaction of factors embedded within the concept of active learning will further our understanding and refinement of occupational science models.

Conclusion

Occupational science has a unique perspective that is highly useful in understanding not only human behavior, but also the essence of human occupation in relation to the myriad of influences that exist. Occupational science allows us to look holistically at our most defining human occupations, and determine how active participation in occupation is facilitated and hindered. Application of occupational science to the relationship between active learning and design will both further the occupation of active learning, and the understanding of occupational science.

Questions

  1. How does classroom design impact the person-object interaction within the occupation of active learning?

  2. How does the manner in which process skills interact with the built environment of furniture and design impact active learning?

  3. Is there a hierarchy of occupational transactions that corresponds to levels of learning such as those categorized by Bloom?

  4. Can a rigorous framework for a hierarchy of occupational transactions be developed for specific situations such as active learning in the classroom or for occupational transaction as a whole?

  5. How can we describe the relationships between the Occupational Transaction Model and the Person-Object Interaction Model as it relates to active learning