Title

Broadening the Occupational Science Lens: Racial Considerations in the Landscape of Shifting U.S. Demographics

1

Location

Portland Room

Start Time

30-9-2016 10:30 AM

End Time

30-9-2016 12:00 PM

Session Type

Panel

Abstract

Broadening the Occupational Science Lens: Racial Considerations in the Landscape of Shifting U.S. Demographics

Keywords: Racial inequalities, occupational justice, occupation and race

Topic: Racial considerations in occupational science

Significance to Occupational Science: Addressing racial considerations is pertinent to Occupational Science, in order to meet the demands that key OS scholars have identified, in regards to broadening our lens to understand occupation in context and translation to policy.

Purpose of Panel Topic:

  1. Engage in critical dialogue about racial perspectives and the impact on occupation

  2. Discuss theoretical perspectives that will enhance occupational scientists’ ability to gain a broader view of racial issues and occupation

  3. Understand changing demographics and need for occupational science to gain other perspectives related to policies and their impact on occupation

Panel Abstract:

The discipline of occupational science has an opportunity to evolve much further, in regards to occupational engagement and justice perspectives, as it relates to underserved and underrepresented individuals (Madsen, Kanstrup & Josephson, 2016). This is particularly timely, given the shifting demographics in the United States, where there is an increasing number of individuals of color.

Methods: Examples of a scoping review related to occupational science and race will serve as a backdrop to 4 studies, which examined various aspects of inequities and occupational justice. 1. A case study of the occupational lives of residents in a racially segregated community in the Deep South will highlight the importance of contextual factors in addressing occupational & health inequities. 2. A scoping review examining the lack of acceptance of Medicaid expansion in southern States (Garfield & Damico, 2016), and how those of a minority race are disproportionately affected, will include the subsequent effect of lack of insurance on daily occupations. 3. A qualitative study (Dunbar, 2015) that included women of color, will be used to illustrate ongoing occupational science needs in regards to qualitative approaches. 4. Finally, methods from a secondary analysis of data from the Infant Feeding Practices Study-II (IFPS-II) will be used to demonstrate how racial disparities are perpetuated in research through limitations such as sampling bias (Pitonyak, Jessop, Pontiggia, Crivelli-Kovach, 2016). The Life Course Health Development (LCHD) model (Halfon & Hotchstein, 2002), and other theoretical perspectives, will be applied as lenses for examining the transaction of race with diverse factors as a social determinant of occupation.

Recommended Discussion Questions

  1. What can occupational scientists do to help inform a broader understanding of the concept of social determinants of occupation?

  2. How can occupational science research best contribute to societal understanding of racial considerations in occupation?

  3. Considering the political environment in the U.S., what role should occupational scientists have in moving towards more equitable policies forward?

References

Dunbar, S.B. (2015). Yolanda’s story: An antenarratological approach to understanding mothering work. Work, 50, 451- 456. doi: 10.3233/WOR-151997

Garfield, R. & Damico, A. (2016, January 21). The coverage gap: Uninsured poor adults in States that do not expand Medicaid- An Update. Retrieved from: http://kff.org/health-reform/issue-brief/the-coverage-gap-uninsured-poor-adults-in-states-that-do-not-expand-medicaid-an-update/view/footnotes/

Halfon, N. & Hochstein, M. (2002). Life course health development: An integrated framework for developing health, policy, and research. The Milbank Quarterly, 80(3), 433-479.

Madsen, J., Kanstrup, A.M. & Josephsson, S. (2016). The assumed relation between occupation and inequality in health. Scandanavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 23, 1-12. doi: 10.3109/11038128.2015.1075065

Pitonyak, J. S., Jessop, A. B., Pontiggia, L., & Crivelli-Kovach, A. (2016). Life course factors associated with initiation and continuation of exclusive breastfeeding. Maternal Child Health Journal, 20(2), 240-249. doi: 10.1007/s10995-015-1823-x

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Sep 30th, 10:30 AM Sep 30th, 12:00 PM

Broadening the Occupational Science Lens: Racial Considerations in the Landscape of Shifting U.S. Demographics

Portland Room

Broadening the Occupational Science Lens: Racial Considerations in the Landscape of Shifting U.S. Demographics

Keywords: Racial inequalities, occupational justice, occupation and race

Topic: Racial considerations in occupational science

Significance to Occupational Science: Addressing racial considerations is pertinent to Occupational Science, in order to meet the demands that key OS scholars have identified, in regards to broadening our lens to understand occupation in context and translation to policy.

Purpose of Panel Topic:

  1. Engage in critical dialogue about racial perspectives and the impact on occupation

  2. Discuss theoretical perspectives that will enhance occupational scientists’ ability to gain a broader view of racial issues and occupation

  3. Understand changing demographics and need for occupational science to gain other perspectives related to policies and their impact on occupation

Panel Abstract:

The discipline of occupational science has an opportunity to evolve much further, in regards to occupational engagement and justice perspectives, as it relates to underserved and underrepresented individuals (Madsen, Kanstrup & Josephson, 2016). This is particularly timely, given the shifting demographics in the United States, where there is an increasing number of individuals of color.

Methods: Examples of a scoping review related to occupational science and race will serve as a backdrop to 4 studies, which examined various aspects of inequities and occupational justice. 1. A case study of the occupational lives of residents in a racially segregated community in the Deep South will highlight the importance of contextual factors in addressing occupational & health inequities. 2. A scoping review examining the lack of acceptance of Medicaid expansion in southern States (Garfield & Damico, 2016), and how those of a minority race are disproportionately affected, will include the subsequent effect of lack of insurance on daily occupations. 3. A qualitative study (Dunbar, 2015) that included women of color, will be used to illustrate ongoing occupational science needs in regards to qualitative approaches. 4. Finally, methods from a secondary analysis of data from the Infant Feeding Practices Study-II (IFPS-II) will be used to demonstrate how racial disparities are perpetuated in research through limitations such as sampling bias (Pitonyak, Jessop, Pontiggia, Crivelli-Kovach, 2016). The Life Course Health Development (LCHD) model (Halfon & Hotchstein, 2002), and other theoretical perspectives, will be applied as lenses for examining the transaction of race with diverse factors as a social determinant of occupation.

Recommended Discussion Questions

  1. What can occupational scientists do to help inform a broader understanding of the concept of social determinants of occupation?

  2. How can occupational science research best contribute to societal understanding of racial considerations in occupation?

  3. Considering the political environment in the U.S., what role should occupational scientists have in moving towards more equitable policies forward?