Title

The zero-to-three transactional effects between family occupations and child emotion regulation

1

Location

Regency Room

Start Time

30-9-2016 3:00 PM

End Time

30-9-2016 4:30 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Title

The zero-to-three transactional effects between family occupations and child emotion regulation

Three key Words

Transactional Perspectives of Occupation; Family occupation; Child Development

Statement of Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore longitudinal transactional effects between family occupations and child emotion regulation across child ages of 14 months to 36 months. Specific research questions are:

(1) Are the intra-individual developmental trajectories of family occupations and child emotion regulation stable?

(2) What is the direction of the relations between family occupations and child emotion regulation?

(3) How do gender, ethnicity, and EHS program status affect the trajectories and transactions?

Description of Methods

This secondary data analysis selected a sample of 2199 mother-child dyads enrolled in the longitudinal Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project. We used examiner’s ratings on seven items from the standardized Bayley Scales of Infant Development (2nd Edition) - Behavioral Rating Scales as children's emotion regulation at 14-, 24-, and 36-months. We also constructed family occupation constructs at corresponding child ages, consisting of the interrelated domains of supportive parent-child interactions, family routines, participating in family activities, learning resources and materials, and secure physical surroundings. The conceptual structure of the family occupation constructs were tested through confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The autoregressive latent trajectory model, generalized to allow unequally spaced observations, was utilized to examine developmental trajectories of family occupations, child emotion regulation, and longitudinal transactional effects between two trajectories (Bollen & Curran, 2004).

Report of Results

Preliminary findings of intra-individual developmental trajectories suggest that later supportive parent-child interactions and child emotion regulation are predicted by their earlier measures. Later child emotion regulation is predicted by earlier supportive parent-child interaction, but not the reverse (Lin & Faldowski, 2015). We expect to see the CFA model for family occupation fits an essentially unidimensional model, suggesting that family occupation a unitary but multi-faceted construct. We also expect to see the transactional effects between the development of family occupations and child emotion regulation.

Implications Related to Occupational Science

This study is expected to expand our knowledge of the development of family occupations and the transactional nature of family occupations relative to children’s early emotion regulation. The creation of the family occupation construct and the study of its transactional effect are potential ways to bring OS-specific perspectives to child development and family studies. Clinicians may apply the domains included in the family occupation construct into their occupation-based and family-centered practices.

Discussion Questions to Further Occupational Science Concepts and Ideas

The authors would like to discuss the ways to study the developmental change of (family) occupation over time. This study tried to attain this goal through creating multiple family occupation constructs and then utilizing longitudinal methods to examine the developmental trajectory of family occupation. How could this methodology be generalized to other studies of occupational development (e.g., pulling variables from different measures to create an occupation variable)? Are there other ways to do if occupational scientists are interested in the developmental change of occupation?

References

Bollen, K. A., & Curran, P. J. (2004). Autoregressive latent Trajectory (ALT) models: A synthesis of two traditions. Sociological Methods & Research, 32(3), 336–383.

Cutchin, M. P., & Dickie, V. A. (Eds.). (2012). Transactional perspectives on occupation. Springer Science & Business Media.

Lin, M. L. & Faldowski, R. A. (2015). The reciprocal effect between parent supportiveness and child emotion regulation predicts cognitive school readiness. Oral presentation at 2015 Society of Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting, Philadelphia, USA.

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Sep 30th, 3:00 PM Sep 30th, 4:30 PM

The zero-to-three transactional effects between family occupations and child emotion regulation

Regency Room

Title

The zero-to-three transactional effects between family occupations and child emotion regulation

Three key Words

Transactional Perspectives of Occupation; Family occupation; Child Development

Statement of Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore longitudinal transactional effects between family occupations and child emotion regulation across child ages of 14 months to 36 months. Specific research questions are:

(1) Are the intra-individual developmental trajectories of family occupations and child emotion regulation stable?

(2) What is the direction of the relations between family occupations and child emotion regulation?

(3) How do gender, ethnicity, and EHS program status affect the trajectories and transactions?

Description of Methods

This secondary data analysis selected a sample of 2199 mother-child dyads enrolled in the longitudinal Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project. We used examiner’s ratings on seven items from the standardized Bayley Scales of Infant Development (2nd Edition) - Behavioral Rating Scales as children's emotion regulation at 14-, 24-, and 36-months. We also constructed family occupation constructs at corresponding child ages, consisting of the interrelated domains of supportive parent-child interactions, family routines, participating in family activities, learning resources and materials, and secure physical surroundings. The conceptual structure of the family occupation constructs were tested through confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The autoregressive latent trajectory model, generalized to allow unequally spaced observations, was utilized to examine developmental trajectories of family occupations, child emotion regulation, and longitudinal transactional effects between two trajectories (Bollen & Curran, 2004).

Report of Results

Preliminary findings of intra-individual developmental trajectories suggest that later supportive parent-child interactions and child emotion regulation are predicted by their earlier measures. Later child emotion regulation is predicted by earlier supportive parent-child interaction, but not the reverse (Lin & Faldowski, 2015). We expect to see the CFA model for family occupation fits an essentially unidimensional model, suggesting that family occupation a unitary but multi-faceted construct. We also expect to see the transactional effects between the development of family occupations and child emotion regulation.

Implications Related to Occupational Science

This study is expected to expand our knowledge of the development of family occupations and the transactional nature of family occupations relative to children’s early emotion regulation. The creation of the family occupation construct and the study of its transactional effect are potential ways to bring OS-specific perspectives to child development and family studies. Clinicians may apply the domains included in the family occupation construct into their occupation-based and family-centered practices.

Discussion Questions to Further Occupational Science Concepts and Ideas

The authors would like to discuss the ways to study the developmental change of (family) occupation over time. This study tried to attain this goal through creating multiple family occupation constructs and then utilizing longitudinal methods to examine the developmental trajectory of family occupation. How could this methodology be generalized to other studies of occupational development (e.g., pulling variables from different measures to create an occupation variable)? Are there other ways to do if occupational scientists are interested in the developmental change of occupation?