Title

Evolving 5th Century Kado Roles, Habits & Routines into Millennial Western Occupation

1

Location

Armory Room

Start Time

1-10-2016 1:30 PM

End Time

1-10-2016 2:30 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Introduction: Over 40 years of occupational engagement in Japanese flower arranging (ikebana; also kado, way of the flower) is one of many sources of author’s interest in navigating East-West traditions. Understanding occupational evolution from ikebana student (deshi) to teacher (sensei) increased through a recent inquiry, (Carrasco, 2014). While teaching ikebana is an occupation with related roles, routines and habits, the practice is also a wellness occupation, and a neurophysiological regulating phenomenon (Homma, Oizumi, Masaoka, 2015). The presentation reports results of the narrative inquiry into shared experiences by American ikebana sensei in their journey from deshi to sensei.

Objective:

  1. Explore depth of personal and pedagogical inspiration for sustained occupational engagement in kado
  2. Draw experiential themes from informants in evolving sensei occupational roles, routines and habits
  3. Extract inferences from informants about learning/teaching in unfamiliar situations

Methodology: Researcher employed qualitative methodology with informants selected using purposive, non-probability sampling. This allowed choosing them for semi-structured interviews intended to enhance the investigation, i.e., exploring experiences of six American sensei in how they evolved roles, routines and habits to become (and continue as) ikebana sensei. Both a priori and emergent categories from transcriptions were considered before confirming or uncovering categories using nVivo software. Computer visualizations will enhance dissemination of information to understand the acquisition and persistence of occupational engagement.

Findings: Common threads emerged on roles, routines and habits that informants performed as workers or spouses while overseas in business, education, or military communities. These are: making a choice for cultural immersion rather than isolation; inspiration from headmaster (iemoto) or sensei; motivation from students’ success; achievement of peace and tranquility while constructing flower designs; feeling of accountability to the Ikebana discipline; respect for Japanese traditions; and loyalty to Ikebana school with which they affiliate; and passion to teach/create ikebana till death.

Conclusion: Ikebana sensei informants showed convergence in sustained occupational engagement in an ancient unfamiliar tradition passed on to them by their sensei. Now, they themselves are inspired by the success of their own deshi, similar to the anthropological interpretation of the iemoto system by Smith (1998). They found meaning in ikebana engagement as described by Waters, Pearce, Backman & Suto (2012) through persistence in learning and teaching while in unlikely places, which has brought them full circle, teaching their deshi in more familiar places here in the American culturescape.

References

  1. Boyatzi, R. E. (1998). Transforming qualitative information: Thematic analysis and code development. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  2. Carrasco, R. C. (2014, June). Flowers as occupation: Narrative inquiry into shared experiences by Ikebana sensei. Poster session presented during the World Federation of Occupational Therapists, Yokohama, Japan
  3. Creswell, J. W. (2013). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  4. Homma, I, Oizumi, R, Masaoka, Y. (2015) Effects of Practicing Ikebana on Anxiety and Respiration. Journal of Depression & Anxiety, 4: 1000187. doi:10.4172/2167-1044.1000187
  5. Riessman, C. K. (2008). Narrative methods for the human sciences. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  6. Smith, R. J. (1998). Transmitting tradition by the rules: An anthropological interpretation of the iemoto system. In Singleton, J. (1998). (Ed.) Learning in likely places. Varieties of apprenticeship in Japan. (pp. 23-32). Cambridge, UK. Cambridge University Press.
  7. Watters, A. M., Pearce, C., Backman, C. L., & Suto, M. J. (2012). Occupational engagement and meaning: The experience of Ikebana practice. Journal of Occupational Science, 20(3), 262-277. doi:10.1080/14427591.2012.709954

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Oct 1st, 1:30 PM Oct 1st, 2:30 PM

Evolving 5th Century Kado Roles, Habits & Routines into Millennial Western Occupation

Armory Room

Introduction: Over 40 years of occupational engagement in Japanese flower arranging (ikebana; also kado, way of the flower) is one of many sources of author’s interest in navigating East-West traditions. Understanding occupational evolution from ikebana student (deshi) to teacher (sensei) increased through a recent inquiry, (Carrasco, 2014). While teaching ikebana is an occupation with related roles, routines and habits, the practice is also a wellness occupation, and a neurophysiological regulating phenomenon (Homma, Oizumi, Masaoka, 2015). The presentation reports results of the narrative inquiry into shared experiences by American ikebana sensei in their journey from deshi to sensei.

Objective:

  1. Explore depth of personal and pedagogical inspiration for sustained occupational engagement in kado
  2. Draw experiential themes from informants in evolving sensei occupational roles, routines and habits
  3. Extract inferences from informants about learning/teaching in unfamiliar situations

Methodology: Researcher employed qualitative methodology with informants selected using purposive, non-probability sampling. This allowed choosing them for semi-structured interviews intended to enhance the investigation, i.e., exploring experiences of six American sensei in how they evolved roles, routines and habits to become (and continue as) ikebana sensei. Both a priori and emergent categories from transcriptions were considered before confirming or uncovering categories using nVivo software. Computer visualizations will enhance dissemination of information to understand the acquisition and persistence of occupational engagement.

Findings: Common threads emerged on roles, routines and habits that informants performed as workers or spouses while overseas in business, education, or military communities. These are: making a choice for cultural immersion rather than isolation; inspiration from headmaster (iemoto) or sensei; motivation from students’ success; achievement of peace and tranquility while constructing flower designs; feeling of accountability to the Ikebana discipline; respect for Japanese traditions; and loyalty to Ikebana school with which they affiliate; and passion to teach/create ikebana till death.

Conclusion: Ikebana sensei informants showed convergence in sustained occupational engagement in an ancient unfamiliar tradition passed on to them by their sensei. Now, they themselves are inspired by the success of their own deshi, similar to the anthropological interpretation of the iemoto system by Smith (1998). They found meaning in ikebana engagement as described by Waters, Pearce, Backman & Suto (2012) through persistence in learning and teaching while in unlikely places, which has brought them full circle, teaching their deshi in more familiar places here in the American culturescape.