Title

Disseminating Occupational Science: An SSO:USA Journal?

1

Location

TBA

Start Time

1-10-2016 12:00 PM

End Time

1-10-2016 1:30 PM

Session Type

Forum

Abstract

Presentation Type: Forum

Title: Disseminating Occupational Science: An SSO:USA Journal?

Key Words: publishing, journal, disciplinary discourse

Aims/Intent: The aim of the forum is to raise questions in a way that will develop a vision for future occupational science dissemination by the Society, generate discussion about the intent and needs of the science and its scientists, and stimulate discourse about broader questions of the intent and future of the science.

Rationale: Publishing opportunities in occupational science are perceived to be limited. Although the discipline has greatly benefitted from its single journal for over twenty years, that journal’s editorial policy does not allow it to be inclusive of all occupational science work (Taylor & Francis). The lack of a dedicated venue that includes research on occupation in practice obscures and hampers fulfillment of the originating intent of the science to contribute to the knowledge base of occupational therapy (Clark et al., 1991; Pierce, 2012). Further, the absence of a journal embracing all types of occupational science prevents a vigorous exploration of the relations between different types of occupational science research and the productive tensions among extra-disciplinary, interdisciplinary, disciplinary, professional, and inter-professional research on occupation. Publications spread across a variety of extra-disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and professional journals are less likely to produce the syntheses required to speed development of the science. This important gap in occupational science dissemination will be examined in this forum.

The SSO:USA Editors Study concluded that (a) all editors agreed a new and fully inclusive journal was needed, (b) there were opportunities for special issues or recurring features in existing journals, and (c) multiple pragmatic and editorial challenges would accompany the launch of a new journal (Pierce, 2010). Since that study, the Society has continued to develop its capacity for publications through the successful establishment of annual meeting proceedings (SSO:USA).

Now, the Society requires a more tangible vision of its future dissemination efforts. The specifics of a potential journal’s mission, targeted contributors and audience, format, and financing all need to be drafted before decisions can be made by the Board. Participants in this forum will contribute to this vision.

Participant Outcomes:

  • Enhanced perspectives on publishing venues and gaps for occupational science researchers.

  • Insights into the pragmatics of journal publishing.

  • Influence on the mission and format of a future occupational science journal

Discussion Questions to Facilitate Occupational Science Concepts and Ideas:

  • What are the publishing patterns and needs of occupational scientists?

  • Should the intermediary step of facilitating special issues or recurring features in existing journals be undertaken prior to the launch of a new journal?

  • If the mission of the journal is inclusive of all types of occupational science research, will it be attractive to all occupational scientists, or only to a subgroup?

  • To what degree should the journal’s mission and format reach out to interdisciplinary or occupational therapy audiences, or both, through special features?

  • Is an online format best?

  • Should the journal be based on annual subscriptions, provided as a member benefit, open-sourced and available to all, or open-sourced and financed through author payments to publish?

References

Clark, F. A., Parham, L. D., Carlson, M. E., Frank, G., Jackson, J., Pierce, D., Wolfe, R. J., & Zemke, R. (1991). Occupational science: Academic innovation in the service of occupational therapy's future. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 45, 300-310.

Pierce, D. (2010, October). Journal editors’ perspectives on publishing occupational science. Paper presented at the joint meeting of the Canadian Society for Occupational Science and the Society for the Study of Occupation: USA, London, Ontario, Canada.

Pierce, D. (2012). Promise. Journal of Occupational Science, 19(4), 298-311. doi:10.1080/14427591.2012.667778

Society for the Study of Occupation: USA. Annual proceedings. http://commons.pacificu.edu/sso_conf/

Taylor & Francis (Eds.). (n.d.). Aims & scope. Journal of Occupational Science. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=rocc20#.VtYapMelcdV

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Oct 1st, 12:00 PM Oct 1st, 1:30 PM

Disseminating Occupational Science: An SSO:USA Journal?

TBA

Presentation Type: Forum

Title: Disseminating Occupational Science: An SSO:USA Journal?

Key Words: publishing, journal, disciplinary discourse

Aims/Intent: The aim of the forum is to raise questions in a way that will develop a vision for future occupational science dissemination by the Society, generate discussion about the intent and needs of the science and its scientists, and stimulate discourse about broader questions of the intent and future of the science.

Rationale: Publishing opportunities in occupational science are perceived to be limited. Although the discipline has greatly benefitted from its single journal for over twenty years, that journal’s editorial policy does not allow it to be inclusive of all occupational science work (Taylor & Francis). The lack of a dedicated venue that includes research on occupation in practice obscures and hampers fulfillment of the originating intent of the science to contribute to the knowledge base of occupational therapy (Clark et al., 1991; Pierce, 2012). Further, the absence of a journal embracing all types of occupational science prevents a vigorous exploration of the relations between different types of occupational science research and the productive tensions among extra-disciplinary, interdisciplinary, disciplinary, professional, and inter-professional research on occupation. Publications spread across a variety of extra-disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and professional journals are less likely to produce the syntheses required to speed development of the science. This important gap in occupational science dissemination will be examined in this forum.

The SSO:USA Editors Study concluded that (a) all editors agreed a new and fully inclusive journal was needed, (b) there were opportunities for special issues or recurring features in existing journals, and (c) multiple pragmatic and editorial challenges would accompany the launch of a new journal (Pierce, 2010). Since that study, the Society has continued to develop its capacity for publications through the successful establishment of annual meeting proceedings (SSO:USA).

Now, the Society requires a more tangible vision of its future dissemination efforts. The specifics of a potential journal’s mission, targeted contributors and audience, format, and financing all need to be drafted before decisions can be made by the Board. Participants in this forum will contribute to this vision.

Participant Outcomes:

  • Enhanced perspectives on publishing venues and gaps for occupational science researchers.

  • Insights into the pragmatics of journal publishing.

  • Influence on the mission and format of a future occupational science journal

Discussion Questions to Facilitate Occupational Science Concepts and Ideas:

  • What are the publishing patterns and needs of occupational scientists?

  • Should the intermediary step of facilitating special issues or recurring features in existing journals be undertaken prior to the launch of a new journal?

  • If the mission of the journal is inclusive of all types of occupational science research, will it be attractive to all occupational scientists, or only to a subgroup?

  • To what degree should the journal’s mission and format reach out to interdisciplinary or occupational therapy audiences, or both, through special features?

  • Is an online format best?

  • Should the journal be based on annual subscriptions, provided as a member benefit, open-sourced and available to all, or open-sourced and financed through author payments to publish?