Title

“Otra vez a la lucha”-“ to the fight again”: immigrants’ occupational struggles during the socioeconomic crisis in Spain

1

Location

Regency Room

Start Time

1-10-2016 10:30 AM

End Time

1-10-2016 12:00 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Statement of purpose:

During the socio-economic crisis in Spain, immigrants have been one of the most affected groups by the general worsening of the social determinants of health with direct implications in their wellbeing (Colectivo-Ioé, 2013). This study focuses on immigrant women from Latin America, living in Spain, which have been in vulnerable situations during the crisis, from 2008 to present. The commitment to facilitating societal transformation and reducing inequities undertaken by Occupational Science (Whiteford & Hocking, 2012) has expanded on an international level. Despite the increase of the scientific production on post-migration occupations there is still a paucity of literature that approaches the daily life of these immigrant women, from an occupational critical perspective. This study was aimed at advancing understanding of immigrant women’s experiences of daily participation in occupations to collaboratively envision actions to promote health and wellbeing.

Description of methods: A Participatory Health Research study was carried out, informed by Boaventura de Sousa Santos critical theory, the Epistemologies of the South (Santos, 2014). Different recruitment strategies (briefings, snowball, janitors, etc.) were used. Six women from Latin America, between 36 and 42 years old participated in the study. Data were generated through group discussion, interviews, diaries and Metaplan. A critical narrative analysis was used to analyze the data generated by group discussion, interviews and diaries. Participants performed a thematic analysis for the Metaplan. Approval of the University of A Coruña Ethics Committee was obtained.

Report of results: 1) the occupational story of each participant; 2) the cross-sectional themes: occupational struggles in daily life and; 3) an Agenda for change set by the participants. This presentation will approach the two latest.

Implications: The findings show singular contributions to Occupational Science, illustrating the impact of structural violence in everyday occupations (racism, gender violence, health and social care professionals oppression, work opportunities linked to sex trade, among others) and how immigrant women negotiate it through daily occupations to survive (participating in occupation with other immigrant women or performing restorative occupations). Therefore, findings challenge the linear understanding of occupational transition and integration after migration by clarifying how a peripheral and volatile area of participation in occupations can be generated in society; the occupational struggles show how participating in occupations can be oppressive but also can work as a strategy for resistance and, similarly, illuminate how participating in occupations can simultaneously challenge and promote wellbeing.

Discussion questions to further occupational science concepts and ideas

  • How gender based categorization of occupations could contribute to oppressive contexts in daily life in other realities?
  • Could occupational struggle work as an articulating concept around the complexities of negotiating occupations in peripheral places of contemporary global societies?
  • Precarious migration enacts occupational struggles: what other situations of the global context can enact occupational struggles?
  • What kind of OS knowledge can contribute to shed light to the complexity of occupational struggles experienced by vulnerable groups?

References

Colectivo Ioé (2013). La población inmigrada ante la crisis: ¿mirando hacia otro lado? [Immigrant population facing the crisis: looking to the other side?] Boletín Ecos, 24. Recuperado de: https://www.fuhem.es/media/cdv/file/biblioteca/Boletin_ECOS/24/la-poblacion-inmigrada-ante-la-crisis_COLECTIVO_IOE_.pdf

Santos, B.D.S. (2014). Más allá del pensamiento abismal: de las líneas globales a una ecología de saberes [Beyond the abyssal thinking; from the global lines to the ecologies of knowledges]. En B.D.S. Santos & M. P. Meneses (Eds.), Epistemologías del sur [Epistemologies of the South]. Madrid: Akal

Whiteford G. & Hocking C. (2012). Occupational Science: Society, Inclusion, Participation. West Sussex (UK): Wiley-Blackwell.

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Oct 1st, 10:30 AM Oct 1st, 12:00 PM

“Otra vez a la lucha”-“ to the fight again”: immigrants’ occupational struggles during the socioeconomic crisis in Spain

Regency Room

Statement of purpose:

During the socio-economic crisis in Spain, immigrants have been one of the most affected groups by the general worsening of the social determinants of health with direct implications in their wellbeing (Colectivo-Ioé, 2013). This study focuses on immigrant women from Latin America, living in Spain, which have been in vulnerable situations during the crisis, from 2008 to present. The commitment to facilitating societal transformation and reducing inequities undertaken by Occupational Science (Whiteford & Hocking, 2012) has expanded on an international level. Despite the increase of the scientific production on post-migration occupations there is still a paucity of literature that approaches the daily life of these immigrant women, from an occupational critical perspective. This study was aimed at advancing understanding of immigrant women’s experiences of daily participation in occupations to collaboratively envision actions to promote health and wellbeing.

Description of methods: A Participatory Health Research study was carried out, informed by Boaventura de Sousa Santos critical theory, the Epistemologies of the South (Santos, 2014). Different recruitment strategies (briefings, snowball, janitors, etc.) were used. Six women from Latin America, between 36 and 42 years old participated in the study. Data were generated through group discussion, interviews, diaries and Metaplan. A critical narrative analysis was used to analyze the data generated by group discussion, interviews and diaries. Participants performed a thematic analysis for the Metaplan. Approval of the University of A Coruña Ethics Committee was obtained.

Report of results: 1) the occupational story of each participant; 2) the cross-sectional themes: occupational struggles in daily life and; 3) an Agenda for change set by the participants. This presentation will approach the two latest.

Implications: The findings show singular contributions to Occupational Science, illustrating the impact of structural violence in everyday occupations (racism, gender violence, health and social care professionals oppression, work opportunities linked to sex trade, among others) and how immigrant women negotiate it through daily occupations to survive (participating in occupation with other immigrant women or performing restorative occupations). Therefore, findings challenge the linear understanding of occupational transition and integration after migration by clarifying how a peripheral and volatile area of participation in occupations can be generated in society; the occupational struggles show how participating in occupations can be oppressive but also can work as a strategy for resistance and, similarly, illuminate how participating in occupations can simultaneously challenge and promote wellbeing.

Discussion questions to further occupational science concepts and ideas

  • How gender based categorization of occupations could contribute to oppressive contexts in daily life in other realities?
  • Could occupational struggle work as an articulating concept around the complexities of negotiating occupations in peripheral places of contemporary global societies?
  • Precarious migration enacts occupational struggles: what other situations of the global context can enact occupational struggles?
  • What kind of OS knowledge can contribute to shed light to the complexity of occupational struggles experienced by vulnerable groups?