Title

Characteristics of valued occupations of frail elderly Japanese men

1

Location

Pre-function area and Great Room 1B

Start Time

19-10-2017 7:00 PM

End Time

19-10-2017 9:00 PM

Session Type

Poster

Abstract

Statement of Purpose: Population aging rates in Japan now exceed 26%, which has caused a doubling in the number of elderly men needing preventive intervention during this decade (Minister of Health, Labor and Welfare, 2015). There is growing recognition that personally valued occupations contribute to individual well-being, however, identifying occupations and providing satisfactory interventions for elderly men is difficult in Japan (Emori, 2010). A previous qualitative study of frail elderly men obtained some viewpoints on their valued occupations (Nakashima et al., 2017) but, in this study, identifying characteristics of valued occupations from the perspective of a wider age group was the focus.


Methods: Study participants were 11 frail elderly men in their 70’s - 90’s, living at home with sufficient cognitive capacities to answer interview questions. Collection of data came from semi-structured interviews, with participants required to complete a pre-interview time-use diary, so they might better identify their own valued occupations. Interview audio data was transcribed verbatim and analyzed line by line using constant comparative analysis to identify categories and codes for descriptions grounded in data. Data was independently analyzed by 2 researchers who then reached a consensus agreement for code/category definitions and naming, followed by peer debriefing.

Results: Based on the data, two categories of occupational performance and occupational choice were created - “Thinking about occupations in consideration of society” and - “The criteria for occupational choice”.

Discussion/implications: In Jonsson (2000), people’s occupations after retirement were described as “People can be attracted by… a similar working method in the past even after their retirement”. With nine of eleven study participants having belonged to a company - in the traditional Japanese valuation of male work priority - and all having had interest in the latest social trends, their occupational engagements of the past may have strongly influenced their current viewpoints on valued occupations. Additionally, for the eldest men, raised in postwar Japan’s tradition of rebuilding society, they still perceived their retirement occupations with an awareness of society and/or membership in groups. Pierce (2013) noted that, compared to women, the numbers of descriptive studies of men in occupational science were fewer. This study may give some insight into the primary property of the occupational engagement processes in Japanese elderly men and contribute to a broader understanding of how they experience their retirement occupations.

Key words: men, elderly, valued occupations

References

Emori, T. (2010). Sagyo ga dekiru toiukoto tsusho [What is “enabling occupations”].The Japanese Journal of Occupational Therapy, 44(10), 1035-1041.

Jonsson, H., Borell, L., & Sadlo, G. (2000). Retirement: An occupational transition with consequences on temporality, rhythm and balance. Journal of Occupational Science, 7(1), 29-37. doi:10.1080/14427591.2000.9686462

Minister of Health, Labor and Wealfare. (2015). Kaigo jokyo hokoku 2015 [Longterm care insurance report 2015]. Retrieved from http://www.mhlw.go.jp/topics/kaigo/osirase/jigyo/m15/1503.html

Nakashima, N., Sakaue, M., Sakaue, T., & Sengoku, Y.(2017). Chiiki ni sumu yoshien dansei koreisha no nitijyo seikatsu niokeru kachi wo oku sagyo no tokutyo ni kansuru sitsuteki kenkyu [A qualitative study of valued occupational characteristics in daily life for frail elderly men living in a community]. Paper presented at The 51st Japanese Occupational Therapy Congress and Expo, Tokyo, Japan.

Pierce, D.(2013). Building occupational science. Japanese Journal of Occupational Science, 7, 2-6. Retrieved from http://www.jsso.jp/JJOS/JJOS7/JJOS7-02-doris.pdf

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Oct 19th, 7:00 PM Oct 19th, 9:00 PM

Characteristics of valued occupations of frail elderly Japanese men

Pre-function area and Great Room 1B

Statement of Purpose: Population aging rates in Japan now exceed 26%, which has caused a doubling in the number of elderly men needing preventive intervention during this decade (Minister of Health, Labor and Welfare, 2015). There is growing recognition that personally valued occupations contribute to individual well-being, however, identifying occupations and providing satisfactory interventions for elderly men is difficult in Japan (Emori, 2010). A previous qualitative study of frail elderly men obtained some viewpoints on their valued occupations (Nakashima et al., 2017) but, in this study, identifying characteristics of valued occupations from the perspective of a wider age group was the focus.


Methods: Study participants were 11 frail elderly men in their 70’s - 90’s, living at home with sufficient cognitive capacities to answer interview questions. Collection of data came from semi-structured interviews, with participants required to complete a pre-interview time-use diary, so they might better identify their own valued occupations. Interview audio data was transcribed verbatim and analyzed line by line using constant comparative analysis to identify categories and codes for descriptions grounded in data. Data was independently analyzed by 2 researchers who then reached a consensus agreement for code/category definitions and naming, followed by peer debriefing.

Results: Based on the data, two categories of occupational performance and occupational choice were created - “Thinking about occupations in consideration of society” and - “The criteria for occupational choice”.

Discussion/implications: In Jonsson (2000), people’s occupations after retirement were described as “People can be attracted by… a similar working method in the past even after their retirement”. With nine of eleven study participants having belonged to a company - in the traditional Japanese valuation of male work priority - and all having had interest in the latest social trends, their occupational engagements of the past may have strongly influenced their current viewpoints on valued occupations. Additionally, for the eldest men, raised in postwar Japan’s tradition of rebuilding society, they still perceived their retirement occupations with an awareness of society and/or membership in groups. Pierce (2013) noted that, compared to women, the numbers of descriptive studies of men in occupational science were fewer. This study may give some insight into the primary property of the occupational engagement processes in Japanese elderly men and contribute to a broader understanding of how they experience their retirement occupations.

Key words: men, elderly, valued occupations