Title

Evaluating Nursing Home Activity Interventions: A Scoping Review

1

Location

Pre-function area and Great Room 1B

Start Time

19-10-2017 7:00 PM

End Time

19-10-2017 9:00 PM

Session Type

Poster

Abstract

Statement of Purpose: Being engaged in meaningful occupations is an important component to quality of life and health for older adults. However, nursing home residents are often found to have poor quality of life. Specifically, inactivity, boredom, and depressive symptoms are common in this population (Pruchno & Rose, 2002). Despite the benefits of occupational engagement on quality of life and the influence on physical and mental health, participating in meaningful activities is limited among nursing home residents (Kolanowski, Buettner, Litaker, & Yu, 2006). Furthermore, facilitating resident occupational engagement is impacted by the diverse nursing home resident population, which includes a broad range of medical, functional, and cognitive abilities (Harris-Kojetin, Sengupta, Park-Lee, & Valverde, 2013). Thus, in order to promote engagement for a heterogeneous population and equip nursing homes with strategies to improve residents’ quality of life, it is vital to explore effective nursing home activity interventions.

Methods: A scoping review methodology was utilized to summarize the current research, identify gaps in literature, and implicate the direction for future research. Three databases were searched. Included articles were: published between 1987 to 2015, written in English, published in a peer-review journal, implemented an activity intervention for long-term nursing home residents without a diagnosis of dementia, and had a study sample of individuals 65 years or older. The initial search resulted in 652 articles. After systematically reviewing manuscripts according to inclusion criteria, a final sample of 17 articles was identified.

Results: The activity intervention articles were targeted for four groups of nursing home residents: residents with dyspnea (n=1), residents with depression (n=2), residents with sleep problems (n=1), and the general nursing home population (n=13). Sixteen interventions demonstrated an improvement in residents’ overall health outcomes. Two types of interventions were commonly implemented to improve the health and wellbeing of nursing home residents: physical activities (n=16) and individually tailored social activity (n=1). Health and well-being were most commonly measured through improvement in health-related quality of life (n=4), mood and affect (n=3), and physical function (n=8).

Discussion/Implications as related to Occupational Science: The findings of this scoping review suggests that there is a wide range of abilities and diagnoses among nursing homes residents as identified by the four types of targeted activity intervention populations. Thus, there is a need for occupational science to examine and develop activity interventions that are designed for a diverse nursing home population.

References

References:

Harris-Kojetin, L., Sengupta, M., Park-Lee, E., & Valverde, R. (2013). Long-Term Care Services in the United States: 2013 Overview. Vital & health statistics. Series 3, Analytical and epidemiological studies/[US Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Center for Health Statistics](37), 1-107.

Kolanowski, A., Buettner, L., Litaker, M., & Yu, F. (2006). Factors that relate to activity engagement in nursing home residents. American Journal of Alzheimers Disease and Other Dementias, 21(1), 15-22.

Pruchno, R. A., & Rose, M. S. (2002). Time use by frail older people in different care settings. Journal of Applied Gerontology, 21(1), 5-23.

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Oct 19th, 7:00 PM Oct 19th, 9:00 PM

Evaluating Nursing Home Activity Interventions: A Scoping Review

Pre-function area and Great Room 1B

Statement of Purpose: Being engaged in meaningful occupations is an important component to quality of life and health for older adults. However, nursing home residents are often found to have poor quality of life. Specifically, inactivity, boredom, and depressive symptoms are common in this population (Pruchno & Rose, 2002). Despite the benefits of occupational engagement on quality of life and the influence on physical and mental health, participating in meaningful activities is limited among nursing home residents (Kolanowski, Buettner, Litaker, & Yu, 2006). Furthermore, facilitating resident occupational engagement is impacted by the diverse nursing home resident population, which includes a broad range of medical, functional, and cognitive abilities (Harris-Kojetin, Sengupta, Park-Lee, & Valverde, 2013). Thus, in order to promote engagement for a heterogeneous population and equip nursing homes with strategies to improve residents’ quality of life, it is vital to explore effective nursing home activity interventions.

Methods: A scoping review methodology was utilized to summarize the current research, identify gaps in literature, and implicate the direction for future research. Three databases were searched. Included articles were: published between 1987 to 2015, written in English, published in a peer-review journal, implemented an activity intervention for long-term nursing home residents without a diagnosis of dementia, and had a study sample of individuals 65 years or older. The initial search resulted in 652 articles. After systematically reviewing manuscripts according to inclusion criteria, a final sample of 17 articles was identified.

Results: The activity intervention articles were targeted for four groups of nursing home residents: residents with dyspnea (n=1), residents with depression (n=2), residents with sleep problems (n=1), and the general nursing home population (n=13). Sixteen interventions demonstrated an improvement in residents’ overall health outcomes. Two types of interventions were commonly implemented to improve the health and wellbeing of nursing home residents: physical activities (n=16) and individually tailored social activity (n=1). Health and well-being were most commonly measured through improvement in health-related quality of life (n=4), mood and affect (n=3), and physical function (n=8).

Discussion/Implications as related to Occupational Science: The findings of this scoping review suggests that there is a wide range of abilities and diagnoses among nursing homes residents as identified by the four types of targeted activity intervention populations. Thus, there is a need for occupational science to examine and develop activity interventions that are designed for a diverse nursing home population.