Title

EXPLORING THE OCCUPATION OF DATING FOR YOUNG WOMEN LIVING IN IRELAND

Presenter Information

Karen McCarthyFollow

Location

Pre-function area and Great Room 1B

Start Time

19-10-2017 7:00 PM

End Time

19-10-2017 9:00 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Statement of Purpose:

The discipline of occupational science has called for an increase in research focusing on the study of occupations. Gray (1997) stated that occupational therapy could benefit from “a more profound understanding of the essence of occupation” (p. 15). Dickie (2003) argues that “one way to achieve this understanding is to examine occupations directly” (p. 120). Dating is an occupation that has not been examined directly and has recently undergone rapid changes in its practice. Although occupational science research has been done on mate selection (Krishnagiri, 1996), there is a dearth of literature exploring the actual activities surrounding mate selection, how one actually participates actively in this selection which the researcher will refer to as dating. This study will address the gap in the literature by exploring the occupation of dating and the experience of young women participating in dating occupations in Ireland.

Method:

A qualitative approach will be used to explore the occupation of dating. Data collection will include the use of semi-structured interviews, direct observation, and cultural material. Interviews will be audiotaped, transcribed. Field notes taken during observation and interviews will be coded using thematic analysis to generate common themes across cases (Braun & Clarke, 2006).

Results:

Dating is described in terms of its form, function and meaning (Larson & Zemke, 2003), including the stages, environments, and occupations within dating. Stigma and the emotional aspect of dating are found to be implications for mental health and well-being. The purpose of dating is explored and illuminates that dating is an occupation with a vison to meeting someone to share occupations with in the future.

Implications related to occupational science:

This research answers the call to contribute to the study of occupations. This study also addresses the gap in literature in the experience of sexuality for persons without a disability and directly addresses the occupation of dating which has not been covered in depth.

Discussion questions to further occupational science concepts and ideas:

How would you define dating? Is dating an occupation or a collection of other occupations with a sole purpose? How does dating differ in other cultures or populations that you have worked with? How can we as occupational scientists address the challenges of studying an occupation that is rapidly changing in society?

Key Words:

Dating, Sexuality, Occupational Science

References

Braun, V. & Clarke, V. (2006). ‘Using thematic analysis in psychology’. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3, pp. 77-101.

Dickie, V. (2003). ‘The role of learning in quilt making’. Journal of Occupational Science,

10(3), pp. 120-129.

Gray, J.M. (1997). ‘Application of the phenomenological method to the concept of occupation’. Journal of Occupational Science: Australia, 4, pp. 5-17.

Krishnagiri, S. (1996). ‘Mate selection as occupation’. In Zemke, R. & Clark, F. (eds.) Occupational Science: The Evolving Discipline. Philidelphia, F.A. Davis Company, pp. 193-203.

Larson, E. A., & Zemke, R. (2003). Shaping the temporal patterns of our lives: The social coordination of occupation. Journal of Occupational Science, 10(2), 80-89.

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Oct 19th, 7:00 PM Oct 19th, 9:00 PM

EXPLORING THE OCCUPATION OF DATING FOR YOUNG WOMEN LIVING IN IRELAND

Pre-function area and Great Room 1B

Statement of Purpose:

The discipline of occupational science has called for an increase in research focusing on the study of occupations. Gray (1997) stated that occupational therapy could benefit from “a more profound understanding of the essence of occupation” (p. 15). Dickie (2003) argues that “one way to achieve this understanding is to examine occupations directly” (p. 120). Dating is an occupation that has not been examined directly and has recently undergone rapid changes in its practice. Although occupational science research has been done on mate selection (Krishnagiri, 1996), there is a dearth of literature exploring the actual activities surrounding mate selection, how one actually participates actively in this selection which the researcher will refer to as dating. This study will address the gap in the literature by exploring the occupation of dating and the experience of young women participating in dating occupations in Ireland.

Method:

A qualitative approach will be used to explore the occupation of dating. Data collection will include the use of semi-structured interviews, direct observation, and cultural material. Interviews will be audiotaped, transcribed. Field notes taken during observation and interviews will be coded using thematic analysis to generate common themes across cases (Braun & Clarke, 2006).

Results:

Dating is described in terms of its form, function and meaning (Larson & Zemke, 2003), including the stages, environments, and occupations within dating. Stigma and the emotional aspect of dating are found to be implications for mental health and well-being. The purpose of dating is explored and illuminates that dating is an occupation with a vison to meeting someone to share occupations with in the future.

Implications related to occupational science:

This research answers the call to contribute to the study of occupations. This study also addresses the gap in literature in the experience of sexuality for persons without a disability and directly addresses the occupation of dating which has not been covered in depth.

Discussion questions to further occupational science concepts and ideas:

How would you define dating? Is dating an occupation or a collection of other occupations with a sole purpose? How does dating differ in other cultures or populations that you have worked with? How can we as occupational scientists address the challenges of studying an occupation that is rapidly changing in society?

Key Words:

Dating, Sexuality, Occupational Science