Title

Mealtime insights: A Photovoice project with African American mothers and their young children

1

Location

Studio 1

Start Time

20-10-2017 3:00 PM

End Time

20-10-2017 4:30 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Type of Submission: Research paper, interested in poster session if declined for presentation

Subtheme: Mothering occupations

Key words: mealtime, mothering, photovoice

Abstract:

Background and purpose: Mothering is a complex and multifaceted occupation that encompasses the nurturing work that women engage in. One important task that occurs within a mothers’ daily routine is that of making meals for their children. It is a major daily occupation in the life of a mother that is often associated with maternal self-efficacy (Horodynski, Stommel, Brophy-Herb, Xie, & Weatherspoon, 2010). It is also been established that ethnicity, class, and gender have effects on motherhood that need to be taken into account when looking at the occupations of motherhood across cultures (Fourquier, 2011). The purpose of this study was to gain a rich, in-depth description of the phenomenon of the mealtime experience for African American mothers with low socioeconomic status and young children living in an inner city environment in the mid-west.

Methods: This study used a phenomenological approach with modified photovoice to capture the essence of mealtime for African American mothers raising young children (Moustakas, 1994; Wang & Burris, 1997). Seven mothers, from an inner city environment in the mid-west, were recruited for the study and consented to two in-depth interviews. Following the initial interview, mothers were asked to take 10-12 photographs over a two week period encompassing moments which reflected their lived experience and meaning around their family mealtimes. Mothers then participated in a second photo elicitation interview using the photos as visual prompts for discussion (Rose, 2012). Phenomenological analyses were used for textual data, with photographs analyzed separately and then together with the textual data from the photo elicitation interviews. Member checks with three mothers were conducted to increase trustworthiness of the data analysis.

Discussion/Conclusion: Results of this study indicate the intricate complexities of the occupation of mealtime and mothering with African American mothers. Overall phenomenological themes will be discussed along with the photographic analysis process and results of the textual data in order to illuminate the essence and meaning of mothering and mealtimes. Occupational scientists can benefit from this study by obtaining in-depth knowledge about the lived experience of mealtime from the perspective of African Americans mothering young children. This research can promote a greater understanding of mothers’ perceptions around mealtime with their young children; especially those mothers who have varied cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. This study will demonstrate how photo techniques can enhance the depth of phenomenological analysis to explicate meaning around mealtime occupations with a diverse group of mothers.

Questions for discussion:

  1. How can initial evidence from this study help inform both occupational science and occupational therapy?
  2. How does photographic analysis and reflection influence our understanding of the construct of the occupations of mothering and mealtime?
  3. What implications does photovoice have in understanding the occupational story of those we work with?

References

Fouquier, K.F. (2011). The concept of motherhood among three generations of African American women. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 43(2), 145-153. doi: 10.1111/j.1547-5069.2011.01394.x

Horodynski, M.A., Stommel, M., Brophy-Herb, H., Xie, Y., & Weatherspoon, L. (2010). Low-income African American and non-Hispanic White mothers’ self-efficacy, “picky eater” perception, and toddler fruit and vegetable consumption. Public Health Nursing, 27(5), 408-417. doi: 10.1111/j.1525-1446.2010.00873.x

Moustakas, C. (1994). Phenomenological research methods (1st ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications INC.

Rose, G. (2012). Visual Methodologies: An introduction to researching with visual methods (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.

Wang, C., & Burris, M.A. (1997). Photovoice: Concept, methodology, and use for participatory needs assessment. Health Education and Behavior, 24(3), 369-387

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Oct 20th, 3:00 PM Oct 20th, 4:30 PM

Mealtime insights: A Photovoice project with African American mothers and their young children

Studio 1

Type of Submission: Research paper, interested in poster session if declined for presentation

Subtheme: Mothering occupations

Key words: mealtime, mothering, photovoice

Abstract:

Background and purpose: Mothering is a complex and multifaceted occupation that encompasses the nurturing work that women engage in. One important task that occurs within a mothers’ daily routine is that of making meals for their children. It is a major daily occupation in the life of a mother that is often associated with maternal self-efficacy (Horodynski, Stommel, Brophy-Herb, Xie, & Weatherspoon, 2010). It is also been established that ethnicity, class, and gender have effects on motherhood that need to be taken into account when looking at the occupations of motherhood across cultures (Fourquier, 2011). The purpose of this study was to gain a rich, in-depth description of the phenomenon of the mealtime experience for African American mothers with low socioeconomic status and young children living in an inner city environment in the mid-west.

Methods: This study used a phenomenological approach with modified photovoice to capture the essence of mealtime for African American mothers raising young children (Moustakas, 1994; Wang & Burris, 1997). Seven mothers, from an inner city environment in the mid-west, were recruited for the study and consented to two in-depth interviews. Following the initial interview, mothers were asked to take 10-12 photographs over a two week period encompassing moments which reflected their lived experience and meaning around their family mealtimes. Mothers then participated in a second photo elicitation interview using the photos as visual prompts for discussion (Rose, 2012). Phenomenological analyses were used for textual data, with photographs analyzed separately and then together with the textual data from the photo elicitation interviews. Member checks with three mothers were conducted to increase trustworthiness of the data analysis.

Discussion/Conclusion: Results of this study indicate the intricate complexities of the occupation of mealtime and mothering with African American mothers. Overall phenomenological themes will be discussed along with the photographic analysis process and results of the textual data in order to illuminate the essence and meaning of mothering and mealtimes. Occupational scientists can benefit from this study by obtaining in-depth knowledge about the lived experience of mealtime from the perspective of African Americans mothering young children. This research can promote a greater understanding of mothers’ perceptions around mealtime with their young children; especially those mothers who have varied cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. This study will demonstrate how photo techniques can enhance the depth of phenomenological analysis to explicate meaning around mealtime occupations with a diverse group of mothers.

Questions for discussion:

  1. How can initial evidence from this study help inform both occupational science and occupational therapy?
  2. How does photographic analysis and reflection influence our understanding of the construct of the occupations of mothering and mealtime?
  3. What implications does photovoice have in understanding the occupational story of those we work with?