Title

How is the concept of gender contemplated within occupational science and occupational therapy?

1

Location

Studio 2

Start Time

20-10-2017 1:00 PM

End Time

20-10-2017 2:30 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Title:
How is the concept of gender contemplated within occupational science and occupational therapy?


Keywords:

Scoping Study, Gender, Occupational Discourses.


Purpose:

A major paradigm shift regarding queer issues occurred over the last 5 years. In Ireland and America equal marriage became a constitutional right (Irish Times, 2015; New York Times, 2016). Media representation of transgender people has increased; “Transparent” “Orange is the New Black”, and “The Danish Girl”. Transgender celebrities have become “du-jour” and their visage commonplace. Trans-actress Laverne Cox graced the cover of Time magazine (2014) and in Ireland, Panti Bliss, a self-titled “gender-discombobulist” (O’Neill, 2014), appeared as the epitomic image of evolving LGBT equality. Within the political sphere transgender rights have drawn attention, with much debate surrounding so-called “bathroom bills” in various American states. House Bill 2 in North Carolina (Washington Post, 2017) raises concerns of political and societal discrimination; and is of relevance in terms of occupational injustices.

This explosion of gender related discourses draws attention to the complex and nuanced meaning of gender and occupations. This study explores the concept of gender and how it manifests within occupational research.


Research Methods:

A scoping review of gender in occupational science and occupational therapy is in process. The methodology is informed by a framework consolidated by Arksey and O’Malley (2002) and enhanced by Levac et al. (2010). Thirty-five search terms were identified. Databases were selected according to relevant journal subscriptions. Duplicated information was eliminated. Information was independently reviewed for inclusion. Disagreements were settled by majority consensus. Data charting was an iterative process and variables to extract were determined by the research team. Information and resulting themes and findings will be documented for dissemination.


Results:

Tentative results indicate themes and specific issues including, among others, gender as a social construct, gender ideologies, division of labour, transitions, societal and cultural impact on occupations as well as evolving concepts and understanding of identity and occupational choice.


Implications to occupational science:

Gender is more than an influence on occupation; it is produced through occupation (Beagan and Saunders, 2005). It is envisioned this study will illuminate gaps and trends regarding gender in occupational literature. This study will contribute information concerning complex and nuanced interplay entrenched in the reciprocity between gender and occupation. Contributions will be made to the gender dialogue by promoting a more inclusive consideration towards non-binary concepts of gender within occupational literature. This study can potentially contribute to research surrounding intersectional gender issues in occupational research.


Discussion questions to further occupational science concepts and ideas.

  • What are the OS/OT discourses on gender?
  • Should gender be considered within OS/OT discourses?
  • Is gender explicitly and tacitly addressed in OS/OT literature?
  • Are there tacit assumptions made regarding gender in the OS/OT discourses?
  • Are certain occupations/activities considered masculine/feminine? Why?
  • Are certain occupations/activities considered masculine/feminine? Why?
  • Is there evidence of gender literacy in OS/OT research?
  • Is gender literacy integrated into OS/OT?
  • Should gender literacy be included as part of occupational science and occupational therapy curricula?

References

Arksey, H. & O'Malley, L. (2005). Scoping studies: Towards a methodological framework. International Journal Social Research Methodology, 8, 1, 19-32.

Beagan, B. & Saunders, S. (2005). Occupations of Masculinity: Producing gender through what men do and don't do. Journal of Occupational Science, 12, 13, 161-169

Levac, D., Colquhoun, H., & O'Brien, K. (2010). Scoping studies: Advancing the methodology. Implementation Science, 5, 69.

O'Neill, R. (2014). Woman in the making: A memoir. Hachette Books, Ireland.

Steinmetz, K. (2014, June). The Transgender Tipping Point. Time, 38-46.

The Irish Times. (2015). Same-sex marriage referendum. Retrieved from http://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/marriage-referendum

The New York Times. (2015). Supreme Court Ruling Makes Same-Sex Marriage a Right Nationwide. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/27/us/supreme-court-same-sex-marriage.html?_r=0

The Washington Post. (2017). North Carolina governor signs bill repealing and replacing transgender bathroom law amid criticism. Retrieved from https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2017/03/30/north-carolina-lawmakers-say-theyve-agreed-on-a-deal-to-repeal-the-bathroom-bill/?utm_term=.89c2b9843807

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Oct 20th, 1:00 PM Oct 20th, 2:30 PM

How is the concept of gender contemplated within occupational science and occupational therapy?

Studio 2

Title:
How is the concept of gender contemplated within occupational science and occupational therapy?


Keywords:

Scoping Study, Gender, Occupational Discourses.


Purpose:

A major paradigm shift regarding queer issues occurred over the last 5 years. In Ireland and America equal marriage became a constitutional right (Irish Times, 2015; New York Times, 2016). Media representation of transgender people has increased; “Transparent” “Orange is the New Black”, and “The Danish Girl”. Transgender celebrities have become “du-jour” and their visage commonplace. Trans-actress Laverne Cox graced the cover of Time magazine (2014) and in Ireland, Panti Bliss, a self-titled “gender-discombobulist” (O’Neill, 2014), appeared as the epitomic image of evolving LGBT equality. Within the political sphere transgender rights have drawn attention, with much debate surrounding so-called “bathroom bills” in various American states. House Bill 2 in North Carolina (Washington Post, 2017) raises concerns of political and societal discrimination; and is of relevance in terms of occupational injustices.

This explosion of gender related discourses draws attention to the complex and nuanced meaning of gender and occupations. This study explores the concept of gender and how it manifests within occupational research.


Research Methods:

A scoping review of gender in occupational science and occupational therapy is in process. The methodology is informed by a framework consolidated by Arksey and O’Malley (2002) and enhanced by Levac et al. (2010). Thirty-five search terms were identified. Databases were selected according to relevant journal subscriptions. Duplicated information was eliminated. Information was independently reviewed for inclusion. Disagreements were settled by majority consensus. Data charting was an iterative process and variables to extract were determined by the research team. Information and resulting themes and findings will be documented for dissemination.


Results:

Tentative results indicate themes and specific issues including, among others, gender as a social construct, gender ideologies, division of labour, transitions, societal and cultural impact on occupations as well as evolving concepts and understanding of identity and occupational choice.


Implications to occupational science:

Gender is more than an influence on occupation; it is produced through occupation (Beagan and Saunders, 2005). It is envisioned this study will illuminate gaps and trends regarding gender in occupational literature. This study will contribute information concerning complex and nuanced interplay entrenched in the reciprocity between gender and occupation. Contributions will be made to the gender dialogue by promoting a more inclusive consideration towards non-binary concepts of gender within occupational literature. This study can potentially contribute to research surrounding intersectional gender issues in occupational research.


Discussion questions to further occupational science concepts and ideas.

  • What are the OS/OT discourses on gender?
  • Should gender be considered within OS/OT discourses?
  • Is gender explicitly and tacitly addressed in OS/OT literature?
  • Are there tacit assumptions made regarding gender in the OS/OT discourses?
  • Are certain occupations/activities considered masculine/feminine? Why?
  • Are certain occupations/activities considered masculine/feminine? Why?
  • Is there evidence of gender literacy in OS/OT research?
  • Is gender literacy integrated into OS/OT?
  • Should gender literacy be included as part of occupational science and occupational therapy curricula?