Title

The transition from high school to university: Correlates of occupational performance and satisfaction to adjustment to university

1

Location

Studio 2

Start Time

20-10-2017 9:30 AM

End Time

20-10-2017 11:30 AM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

The transition from high school to university can be an exciting time, but some students may have difficulty with the new context of university. Students who do not adapt well to university may be at risk for mental health concerns and/or dropping out of school; both of which can impact their lifetime earning potential and quality of life. University support services are overwhelmed and unable to provide services for all the needs that are found on campus. As a result, students may find excessive wait times for services or may not seek services at all. A student’s occupational performance (OP) may impact their adaptation to university, but little research looks at the occupations of university students or how it relates to their adaptation to university. In addition, most of the research on the OP of students looks at those with an identified disability. This study looks at the OP and performance satisfaction (PS) of a general population of university students and correlates it to adaptation to university. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire (SACQ) were administered to a sample of students who attend a Midwestern, public university to explore OP and PS and their adaptation to university. The overall mean self-perceived OP score was 30.23 (SD=7.19) and PS score was 27.51 (SD =7.79) among the sample. Descriptive statistics indicated that time management (n=51), making new friends (n=43), and sleep (n=39) were the three most commonly reported OP deficits among this sample. Productivity had the most reported deficits (175 mentions over 34 deficits). Preliminary exploratory analysis uncovered that students who had higher scores in OP had higher scores that were statistically significant in social adjustment (r= 0.25, p=0.02) and personal emotional adjustment (r=0.25, p=0.02). Also, higher scores in PS demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with higher scores in academic adjustment (r=0.24, p=0.02), social adjustment (r=0.23, p=0.03), and personal emotional adjustment (r=0.30, p=.01). This study can provide a foundation for the exploration of occupation as it relates to the adaptation of university students to university and into adulthood. The impact of a poor transition on the life trajectory of a student should not be underestimated and further exploration of the OP and PS of transitioning university students can inform screening systems and services for individuals who are “at risk” of dropping out of school and/or who may experience mental health concerns.

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Oct 20th, 9:30 AM Oct 20th, 11:30 AM

The transition from high school to university: Correlates of occupational performance and satisfaction to adjustment to university

Studio 2

The transition from high school to university can be an exciting time, but some students may have difficulty with the new context of university. Students who do not adapt well to university may be at risk for mental health concerns and/or dropping out of school; both of which can impact their lifetime earning potential and quality of life. University support services are overwhelmed and unable to provide services for all the needs that are found on campus. As a result, students may find excessive wait times for services or may not seek services at all. A student’s occupational performance (OP) may impact their adaptation to university, but little research looks at the occupations of university students or how it relates to their adaptation to university. In addition, most of the research on the OP of students looks at those with an identified disability. This study looks at the OP and performance satisfaction (PS) of a general population of university students and correlates it to adaptation to university. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire (SACQ) were administered to a sample of students who attend a Midwestern, public university to explore OP and PS and their adaptation to university. The overall mean self-perceived OP score was 30.23 (SD=7.19) and PS score was 27.51 (SD =7.79) among the sample. Descriptive statistics indicated that time management (n=51), making new friends (n=43), and sleep (n=39) were the three most commonly reported OP deficits among this sample. Productivity had the most reported deficits (175 mentions over 34 deficits). Preliminary exploratory analysis uncovered that students who had higher scores in OP had higher scores that were statistically significant in social adjustment (r= 0.25, p=0.02) and personal emotional adjustment (r=0.25, p=0.02). Also, higher scores in PS demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with higher scores in academic adjustment (r=0.24, p=0.02), social adjustment (r=0.23, p=0.03), and personal emotional adjustment (r=0.30, p=.01). This study can provide a foundation for the exploration of occupation as it relates to the adaptation of university students to university and into adulthood. The impact of a poor transition on the life trajectory of a student should not be underestimated and further exploration of the OP and PS of transitioning university students can inform screening systems and services for individuals who are “at risk” of dropping out of school and/or who may experience mental health concerns.