Title

Play in 6 month olds later diagnosed with autism

1

Location

Studio 1

Start Time

20-10-2017 3:00 PM

End Time

20-10-2017 4:30 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Statement of Purpose: Few researchers have examined early play behaviors in mid infancy; with even fewer using home videos. Early play behaviors include the ability to explore the environment, play with objects, and attend and interact with a caregiver. These may provide valuable information about sensory, motor, cognitive, and social functioning that may predict autism risk. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the relation between infant play behaviors at 5 1/2-7 months and a later diagnosis of autism, using retrospective video analysis.

Description of Methods: In this descriptive pilot study,researchers examined home videos, of 10 infants ages 5 1/2-7 months , 5 who later later received a diagnosis of autism , and 5 who are typically developing. Researchers viewed video footage of infants, which included the infant interacting with a caregiver and playing. Coders were blind to outcome category (autism or typically developing), which was provided by the parent. Researchers used the Revised Knox Preschool Play scale (RKPPS) to code dimensions of play, including gross and fine motor skills, early imitation and early social and communication behaviors (e.g participation) (Knox, 2008). Researchers operationally defined play categories and established inter-rater reliability. Additionally, researchers used the Functional Emotional Assessment Scale(FEAS) to code babies' abilities to organize play interactions with objects and people and to engage in reciprocal interactions and communication (Greenspan & DeGangi, 2001). Data were analyzed descriptively.

Report of Results: Infants later diagnosed with autism scored lower than those later determined to be typically developing in all dimensions of play and on items in the FEAS. Researchers correctly identified 4 of the 5 children with autism and all of the typically developing children. Results suggest that play skills observed in a naturalistic context captured by home video can be used to identify infants at risk for autism.Limitations include small sample size, variability of age, and limited quality of videos.

Implications for Occupational Science: Play is a primary occupation of childhood (Parham, 2008) and is a critical factor in cognitive, physical, social and emotional development. Infant play is a co-occupation between infant and caregiver (Olson, 2004). Co-occupations of infants and caregivers center on social interactions and playful routines studied here.

Discussion Questions: If we can identify infants at risk for autism and intervene early,how might that enhance caregiver infant co-occupations? How might retrospective video analysis be appropriate for the study of occupation?

autism, co-ocupation, play

References

Greenspan S.I., DeGangi G. (2001). Research on the FEAS: Test development, reliability, and validity studies. in S. Greenspan, G DeGangi,& S Wieder (Eds.), The Functional Emotional Assessment Scale (FEAS) for infancy and early childhood: Clinical and research applications (pp. 167-247). Bethesda, MD: Interdisciplinary Council on Developmental and Learning Disorders (ICDL), www.icdl.com.

Knox, S. (2008). Development and current use of the Revised Knox Preschool Play Scale. In L. D. Parham & L. S. Fazio (Eds.),Play in occupational therapy for children.( 2nd ed.) (pp.55-70). St Louis: Mosby.

Olson, J.A.(2004). Mothering co- occupations in caring for infants and young children. In S.A. Esdaile & J.A. Olson (Eds.). Mothering occupations: Challenge, agency, and participation (pp.28-51). Philadelphia: F.A. Davis.

Parham, L. D. (2008). Play and occupational therapy. In L. D. Parham & L. S. Fazio (Eds.). Play in occupational therapy for children (pp. 3-39). St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

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Oct 20th, 3:00 PM Oct 20th, 4:30 PM

Play in 6 month olds later diagnosed with autism

Studio 1

Statement of Purpose: Few researchers have examined early play behaviors in mid infancy; with even fewer using home videos. Early play behaviors include the ability to explore the environment, play with objects, and attend and interact with a caregiver. These may provide valuable information about sensory, motor, cognitive, and social functioning that may predict autism risk. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the relation between infant play behaviors at 5 1/2-7 months and a later diagnosis of autism, using retrospective video analysis.

Description of Methods: In this descriptive pilot study,researchers examined home videos, of 10 infants ages 5 1/2-7 months , 5 who later later received a diagnosis of autism , and 5 who are typically developing. Researchers viewed video footage of infants, which included the infant interacting with a caregiver and playing. Coders were blind to outcome category (autism or typically developing), which was provided by the parent. Researchers used the Revised Knox Preschool Play scale (RKPPS) to code dimensions of play, including gross and fine motor skills, early imitation and early social and communication behaviors (e.g participation) (Knox, 2008). Researchers operationally defined play categories and established inter-rater reliability. Additionally, researchers used the Functional Emotional Assessment Scale(FEAS) to code babies' abilities to organize play interactions with objects and people and to engage in reciprocal interactions and communication (Greenspan & DeGangi, 2001). Data were analyzed descriptively.

Report of Results: Infants later diagnosed with autism scored lower than those later determined to be typically developing in all dimensions of play and on items in the FEAS. Researchers correctly identified 4 of the 5 children with autism and all of the typically developing children. Results suggest that play skills observed in a naturalistic context captured by home video can be used to identify infants at risk for autism.Limitations include small sample size, variability of age, and limited quality of videos.

Implications for Occupational Science: Play is a primary occupation of childhood (Parham, 2008) and is a critical factor in cognitive, physical, social and emotional development. Infant play is a co-occupation between infant and caregiver (Olson, 2004). Co-occupations of infants and caregivers center on social interactions and playful routines studied here.

Discussion Questions: If we can identify infants at risk for autism and intervene early,how might that enhance caregiver infant co-occupations? How might retrospective video analysis be appropriate for the study of occupation?

autism, co-ocupation, play