Title

Belonging and quality of life as perceived by people with advanced cancer who live at home

1

Location

Studio 1

Start Time

21-10-2017 11:30 AM

End Time

21-10-2017 12:30 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Purpose: In previous research (Peoples, Nissen, Brandt, & la Cour, 2017), we explored how people with advanced cancer who live at home perceive quality of life, which pointed to the importance of relationships with others to the experience of quality of life. These emerging findings resonate with the theoretical conceptualization of belonging within occupational science, promting us to explore further how perceived quality of life may be associated with belonging when living with advanced cancer. The purpose was therefore to gain a deeper understanding of the ways in which belonging is perceived as an aspect of quality of life by people with advanced cancer.

Method: The study employed a qualitative approach using a combination of qualitative interviews and photo-elicitation. A thematic approach was used to analyse data form 18 interviews and 77 photographs. Nine participants took part in the study.

Results: The findings suggest that maintaining a sense of belonging was associated with quality of life and was expressed as a complex and challenging process when living with life moving towards its end. The data supported the theoretical dimensions of belonging noted in occupational science and contribute with knowledge about artifacts as mediators of belonging which may enable valued social connections as well as evoke existential and spiritual concerns at end of life.

Implications in relation to OS: This study adds to knowledge within occupational science of how quality of life and belonging may be linked. However, there is a need for further research, for example to understand how artifacts may be linked to dimensions of belonging, and to understand the impact of potential negative connotation of belonging, such as feelings of isolation.

Questions for discussion:

  • How may research about quality of life from the perspective of people living with a life-threatening illness, add to knowledge of the concept of belonging within the occupational science literature?
  • How may knowledge about potential barriers of belonging contribute to the concept of belonging in the occupational science literature?

Key words: End-of-life, everyday life, photo-elicitation.

References

Peoples, H., Nissen, N., Brandt, Å., & la Cour, K. (2017). Perceptions of quality of life by people with advanced cancer who live at home. Scand J Caring Sci, (In review - unpublished manuscript).

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Oct 21st, 11:30 AM Oct 21st, 12:30 PM

Belonging and quality of life as perceived by people with advanced cancer who live at home

Studio 1

Purpose: In previous research (Peoples, Nissen, Brandt, & la Cour, 2017), we explored how people with advanced cancer who live at home perceive quality of life, which pointed to the importance of relationships with others to the experience of quality of life. These emerging findings resonate with the theoretical conceptualization of belonging within occupational science, promting us to explore further how perceived quality of life may be associated with belonging when living with advanced cancer. The purpose was therefore to gain a deeper understanding of the ways in which belonging is perceived as an aspect of quality of life by people with advanced cancer.

Method: The study employed a qualitative approach using a combination of qualitative interviews and photo-elicitation. A thematic approach was used to analyse data form 18 interviews and 77 photographs. Nine participants took part in the study.

Results: The findings suggest that maintaining a sense of belonging was associated with quality of life and was expressed as a complex and challenging process when living with life moving towards its end. The data supported the theoretical dimensions of belonging noted in occupational science and contribute with knowledge about artifacts as mediators of belonging which may enable valued social connections as well as evoke existential and spiritual concerns at end of life.

Implications in relation to OS: This study adds to knowledge within occupational science of how quality of life and belonging may be linked. However, there is a need for further research, for example to understand how artifacts may be linked to dimensions of belonging, and to understand the impact of potential negative connotation of belonging, such as feelings of isolation.

Questions for discussion:

  • How may research about quality of life from the perspective of people living with a life-threatening illness, add to knowledge of the concept of belonging within the occupational science literature?
  • How may knowledge about potential barriers of belonging contribute to the concept of belonging in the occupational science literature?

Key words: End-of-life, everyday life, photo-elicitation.