Title

Morning Routines: Revelations about Participation – Year 4

1

Location

Studio 2

Start Time

21-10-2017 2:30 PM

End Time

21-10-2017 3:30 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Title: Morning Routines: Revelations about Participation – Year 4

Statement of purpose: Morning routines are critical to setting the flow of the entire day. Analysis of the literature reveals a lack of information related to the morning routines of persons with disabilities. The purpose of this study was to focus attention on the importance of morning routines, to add descriptive information regarding the morning routines of persons with chronic disabilities, and to further developing the construct of morning routines.

Description of methods: Participants included a convenience sample of eleven individuals with a chronic disability and ten individuals without known disabilities. Qualitative cross-case analysis was used to initially code and analyze the data collected through the photo-elicited interviews. Grounded Theory and constant comparative analysis were used to further analyze emerging themes/constructs as data was collected over the four-year period . Unstructured and semi structured interviews were conducted using the participant-generated photographs to guide questioning. Although this research was strictly qualitative, numerical trends seen within the data collected were observed and will be reported.

Report of results: The following parts of a morning routine emerged from the coding: Occupations/activities, Objects, Temporality, Context, Pleasure and Motivation. Morning routines as a construct will be put forward and described. Notable differences between persons with and without disabilities included the number of medical objects used, critical placement of objects, temporal differences, and for those who were retired – activity and physical context differences. In particular, individuals with chronic disabilities who were retired were missing a key part of the morning/daily routine most retirees enjoy – volunteering.

Implications related to occupational science: Routines are the underlying support for daily occupations. Understanding and describing routines will add to basic knowledge in occupational science. As our basic knowledge of occupation expands, we can do the more complex research.

Discussion questions to further occupational science concepts and ideas:

1. What should be the next direction for researching morning routines?

2. What are your thoughts about impact of chronic disabilities on participation in the retired population?

3. How is the digital revolution changing your morning routine?

Three Key Words:

Morning routines, Qualitative research, Photography

References

Clark, F., Sanders, K., Carlson, M., Blanche, E., & Jackson, J. (2007). Synthesis of habit theory. OTJR: Occupation, Participation, and Health, 27: 7S-23S

Gallimore, R. & Lopez, E. M. (2002). Everyday routines, human agency, and ecocultural context: Construction and maintenance of individual habits. The Occupational Therapy Journal of Research, 22: 705-755.

Jonsson, H., Borell, L., & Sadlo, G. (2000). Retirement: An occupational transition with consequences for temporality, balance and meaning of occupations. Journal of Occupational Science, 7:1, 29-37. DOI: 10.1080/14427591.2000.9686462

Kolb, S. M. (2012). Grounded Theory and the Constant Comparative Method: Valid Research Strategies for Educators. Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy Studies, 3(1): 83-86. DOI: 10.1.1.301.9451

Royeen, C. B. (2010). Towards an emerging understanding of morning routines: A preliminary study using developing methods in art-based inquiry. The Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, 38(1): 30-42.

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Oct 21st, 2:30 PM Oct 21st, 3:30 PM

Morning Routines: Revelations about Participation – Year 4

Studio 2

Title: Morning Routines: Revelations about Participation – Year 4

Statement of purpose: Morning routines are critical to setting the flow of the entire day. Analysis of the literature reveals a lack of information related to the morning routines of persons with disabilities. The purpose of this study was to focus attention on the importance of morning routines, to add descriptive information regarding the morning routines of persons with chronic disabilities, and to further developing the construct of morning routines.

Description of methods: Participants included a convenience sample of eleven individuals with a chronic disability and ten individuals without known disabilities. Qualitative cross-case analysis was used to initially code and analyze the data collected through the photo-elicited interviews. Grounded Theory and constant comparative analysis were used to further analyze emerging themes/constructs as data was collected over the four-year period . Unstructured and semi structured interviews were conducted using the participant-generated photographs to guide questioning. Although this research was strictly qualitative, numerical trends seen within the data collected were observed and will be reported.

Report of results: The following parts of a morning routine emerged from the coding: Occupations/activities, Objects, Temporality, Context, Pleasure and Motivation. Morning routines as a construct will be put forward and described. Notable differences between persons with and without disabilities included the number of medical objects used, critical placement of objects, temporal differences, and for those who were retired – activity and physical context differences. In particular, individuals with chronic disabilities who were retired were missing a key part of the morning/daily routine most retirees enjoy – volunteering.

Implications related to occupational science: Routines are the underlying support for daily occupations. Understanding and describing routines will add to basic knowledge in occupational science. As our basic knowledge of occupation expands, we can do the more complex research.

Discussion questions to further occupational science concepts and ideas:

1. What should be the next direction for researching morning routines?

2. What are your thoughts about impact of chronic disabilities on participation in the retired population?

3. How is the digital revolution changing your morning routine?

Three Key Words:

Morning routines, Qualitative research, Photography